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Early-Stage Glioblastomas: MR Imaging–Based Classification and Imaging Evidence of Progressive Growth

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Neuroradiology, November 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

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19 Mendeley
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Title
Early-Stage Glioblastomas: MR Imaging–Based Classification and Imaging Evidence of Progressive Growth
Published in
American Journal of Neuroradiology, November 2016
DOI 10.3174/ajnr.a5015
Pubmed ID
Authors

C.H. Toh, M. Castillo

Abstract

The serial imaging changes describing the growth of glioblastomas from small to large tumors are seldom reported. Our aim was to classify the imaging patterns of early-stage glioblastomas and to define the order of appearance of different imaging patterns that occur during the growth of small glioblastomas. Medical records and preoperative MR imaging studies of patients diagnosed with glioblastoma between 2006 and 2013 were reviewed. Patients were included if their MR imaging studies showed early-stage glioblastomas, defined as small MR imaging lesions detected early in the course of the disease, demonstrating abnormal signal intensity but the absence of classic imaging findings of glioblastoma. Each lesion was reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists independently for location, signal intensity, involvement of GM and/or WM, and contrast-enhancement pattern on MR imaging. Twenty-six patients with 31 preoperative MR imaging studies met the inclusion criteria. Early-stage glioblastomas were classified into 3 types and were all hyperintense on FLAIR/T2-weighted images. Type I lesions predominantly involved cortical GM (n = 3). Type II (n = 12) and III (n = 16) lesions involved both cortical GM and subcortical WM. Focal contrast enhancement was present only in type III lesions at the gray-white junction. Interobserver agreement was excellent (|gk = 0.95; P < .001) for lesion-type classification. Transformations of lesions from type I to type II and type II to type III were observed on follow-up MR imaging studies. The early-stage glioblastomas of 16 patients were pathologically confirmed after imaging progression to classic glioblastoma. Cortical lesions may be the earliest MR imaging-detectable abnormality in some human glioblastomas. These cortical tumors may progress to involve WM.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 5%
Unknown 18 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 32%
Unspecified 3 16%
Student > Master 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Other 4 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 47%
Unspecified 5 26%
Neuroscience 3 16%
Computer Science 1 5%
Physics and Astronomy 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 July 2019.
All research outputs
#2,488,309
of 13,644,952 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#596
of 3,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,922
of 256,251 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#26
of 99 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,644,952 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,435 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,251 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 99 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.