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A critical evaluation of the utility of eggshells for estimating mercury concentrations in avian eggs

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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30 Mendeley
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Title
A critical evaluation of the utility of eggshells for estimating mercury concentrations in avian eggs
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, March 2017
DOI 10.1002/etc.3777
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah H. Peterson, Joshua T. Ackerman, Collin A. Eagles-Smith, C. Alex Hartman, Mark P. Herzog

Abstract

Eggshells are a potential tool for non-lethally sampling contaminant concentrations in bird eggs, yet few studies have examined their utility to represent mercury exposure. We assessed mercury concentrations in eggshell components for 23 bird species and determined whether they correlated with total mercury (THg) in egg contents. We designed a multi-experiment analysis to examine how THg is partitioned into eggshell components, specifically hardened eggshells, material adhered to the eggshell, and inner eggshell membranes. THg concentrations in eggshells were much lower than in egg contents, and almost all of the THg within the eggshell was contained within material adhered to eggshells and inner eggshell membranes, and specifically not within calcium-rich hardened eggshells. Despite having very little mercury, THg concentrations in hardened eggshells had the strongest correlation with egg contents among all eggshell components. However, species with the same THg concentrations in eggshells had different THg concentrations in egg contents, indicating that there is no global predictive equation among species for the relationship between eggshell and egg content THg concentrations. Further, for all species, THg concentrations in eggshells decreased with relative embryo age. Although the majority of mercury in eggshells was contained within other eggshell components and not within hardened eggshells, THg in hardened eggshells can be used to estimate THg concentrations in egg contents, if embryo age and species are addressed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 20%
Student > Bachelor 5 17%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 40%
Environmental Science 9 30%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Chemistry 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2018.
All research outputs
#5,281,366
of 20,558,827 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#987
of 5,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,505
of 274,916 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#14
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,558,827 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,196 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,916 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.