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How Medicine May Save the Life of US Immigration Policy: From Clinical and Educational Encounters to Ethical Public Policy

Overview of attention for article published in The AMA Journal of Ethic, March 2017
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114 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Mendeley
Title
How Medicine May Save the Life of US Immigration Policy: From Clinical and Educational Encounters to Ethical Public Policy
Published in
The AMA Journal of Ethic, March 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.3.peer1-1703
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Medicine has a conceptual contribution to make to the immigration debate. Our nation has been unable to move forward with meaningful immigration reform because many citizens seem to assume that immigrants are in the United States to access benefits to which they are not entitled. In contrast, when medicine encounters undocumented immigrants in the health care or medical education setting, it is obvious that their contributions to our health care system are denied by exclusionary laws. When the system is amended to be inclusive, immigrants become contributors to the systems that they access. I illustrate this thesis concerning the benefits of inclusion through an examination of the issues of forced medical repatriation, access to health insurance, and the access of undocumented students to medical education.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 114 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 5 36%
Researcher 2 14%
Student > Master 2 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 3 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 14%
Social Sciences 2 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Psychology 1 7%
Other 1 7%