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Disease-Associated Changes in Bile Acid Profiles and Links to Altered Gut Microbiota

Overview of attention for article published in Digestive Diseases, March 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#50 of 779)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

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1 blog
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6 X users
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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75 Dimensions

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155 Mendeley
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Title
Disease-Associated Changes in Bile Acid Profiles and Links to Altered Gut Microbiota
Published in
Digestive Diseases, March 2017
DOI 10.1159/000450907
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan A. Joyce, Cormac G.M. Gahan

Abstract

The gastrointestinal microbiota plays a central role in the host metabolism of bile acids through deconjugation and dehydroxylation reactions, which generate unconjugated free bile acids and secondary bile acids respectively. These microbially generated bile acids are particularly potent signalling molecules that interact with host bile acid receptors (including the farnesoid X receptor, vitamin D receptor and TGR5 receptor) to trigger cellular responses that play essential roles in host lipid metabolism, electrolyte transport and immune regulation. Perturbations of microbial populations in the gut can therefore profoundly alter bile acid profiles in the host to impact upon the digestive and signalling properties of bile acids in the human superorganism. A number of recent studies have clearly demonstrated the occurrence of microbial disturbances allied to alterations in host bile acid profiles that occur across a range of disease states. Intestinal diseases including irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), short bowel syndrome and Clostridium difficile infection all exhibit concurrent alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota and changes to host bile acid profiles. Similarly, extraintestinal diseases and syndromes such as asthma and obesity may be linked to aberrant bile acid profiles in the host. Here, we focus upon recent studies that highlight the links between alterations to gut microbial communities and altered bile acid profiles across a range of diseases from asthma to IBD.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 155 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 155 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 14%
Researcher 20 13%
Student > Bachelor 17 11%
Student > Master 14 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 26 17%
Unknown 49 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 29 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 12 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 4%
Other 17 11%
Unknown 52 34%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2017.
All research outputs
#2,709,805
of 22,958,253 outputs
Outputs from Digestive Diseases
#50
of 779 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,660
of 311,244 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Digestive Diseases
#1
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,958,253 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 779 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,244 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.