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When and How Should Clinicians Share Details from a Health Record with Patients with Mental Illness?

Overview of attention for article published in The AMA Journal of Ethic, March 2017
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Title
When and How Should Clinicians Share Details from a Health Record with Patients with Mental Illness?
Published in
The AMA Journal of Ethic, March 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.3.ecas3-1703
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Stigma associated with mental illness-a public health crisis-is perpetuated by the language used to describe and document it. Psychiatric pathology and how it can be perceived among clinicians contribute to the marginalization of patients, which exacerbates their vulnerability. Clinical documentation of mental illness has long been mired in pejorative language that perpetuates negative assumptions about those with mental illness. Although patients have the legal right to view their health record, sharing mental health notes with patients remains a sensitive issue, largely due to clinicians' fears that review of this content might cause harm, specifically psychiatric destabilization. However, the ethical principles of justice, beneficence, and autonomy as well as nonmaleficence must be considered by clinicians in determining when and how to share psychiatric details from a health record with their patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 61 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 33%
Researcher 3 25%
Student > Master 2 17%
Unspecified 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 33%
Psychology 3 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Social Sciences 1 8%
Other 1 8%