↓ Skip to main content

Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in nonhuman primate model of dysmetabolism and diabetes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, October 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in nonhuman primate model of dysmetabolism and diabetes
Published in
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12872-015-0133-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Haihua Gu, Yongqiang Liu, Shuang Mei, Bingdi Wang, Guofeng Sun, Xiaoli Wang, Yongfu Xiao, Michael Staup, Francine M. Gregoire, Keefe Chng, Yixin Wang

Abstract

Diabetes is one of the major risk factors for cardiomyopathy and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (EF) and highly associated with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in human. This study aimed 1) to noninvasively assess cardiac function using echocardiography; 2) to test the hypothesis that like diabetic human, cardiac function may also be compromised; in spontaneously developed obese, dysmetabolic and diabetic nonhuman primates (NHPs). Cardiovascular functions were measured by noninvasive echocardiography in 28 control, 20 dysmetabolic/pre-diabetic and 41 diabetic cynomolgus monkeys based on fasting blood glucose and other metabolic status. The LV end-systolic volume (ESV) was higher while end-diastolic volume (EDV, 12 ± 5.7 mL) and EF (63 ± 12.8 %) significantly lower in the diabetic compared to control (14 ± 7 mL and 68 ± 9.8 %) group, respectively. The E/A ratio of LV trans-mitral peak flow rate during early (E) over late (A) diastole was significantly lower in the diabetic (1.19 ± 0.45) than control (1.44 ± 0.48) group. E-wave deceleration time (E DT) was prolonged in the diabetic (89 ± 41 ms) compared to control (78 ± 26 ms) group. Left atrial (LA) maximal dimension (LADmax) was significantly greater in the diabetic (1.3 ± 0.17 cm) than control (1.1 ± 0.16 cm) group. Biochemical tests showed that total cholesterol and LDL were significant higher in the diabetic (167 ± 63 and 69 ± 37 mg/dL) than both pre-diabetic (113 ± 37 and 41 ± 23 mg/dL) and control (120 ± 28 and 41 ± 17 mg/dL) groups, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that LV systolic (reduced EF) and diastolic (abnormal E/A ratio) dysfunctions are significantly correlated with aging and hyperglycemia. Histopathology examination of the necropsy heart revealed inflammatory infiltration, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fragmentation, indicating the myocardial ischemia and remodeling which is consistent with the LV dysfunction phenotype. Using noninvasive echocardiography, the present study demonstrated for the first time that dysmetabolic and diabetic NHPs are associated with LV systolic (increased ESV, decreased EF, etc.) and diastolic (decreased EDV and E/A ratio, prolonged E DT, etc.) dysfunctions, accompanied by LA hypertrophic remodeling (increased LADmax), the phenotypes similarly to those found in diabetic patients. Thus, spontaneously developed dysmetabolic and diabetic NHPs is a highly translatable model to human diseases not only in the pathogenic mechanisms but also can be used for testing novel therapies for cardiometabolic disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 25%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 19%
Other 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 56%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2017.
All research outputs
#11,380,918
of 14,350,170 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
#634
of 940 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,642
of 258,676 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,350,170 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 940 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,676 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them