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Altered neuropathic pain behaviour in a rat model of depression is associated with changes in inflammatory gene expression in the amygdala

Overview of attention for article published in Genes, Brain & Behavior, August 2013
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2 tweeters

Citations

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49 Dimensions

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68 Mendeley
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Title
Altered neuropathic pain behaviour in a rat model of depression is associated with changes in inflammatory gene expression in the amygdala
Published in
Genes, Brain & Behavior, August 2013
DOI 10.1111/gbb.12080
Pubmed ID
Authors

N. N. Burke, E. Geoghegan, D. M. Kerr, O. Moriarty, D. P. Finn, M. Roche

Abstract

The association between chronic pain and depression is widely recognized, the comorbidity of which leads to a heavier disease burden, increased disability and poor treatment response. This study examined nociceptive responding to mechanical and thermal stimuli prior to and following L5-L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), a model of neuropathic pain, in the olfactory bulbectomized (OB) rat model of depression. Associated changes in the expression of genes encoding for markers of glial activation and cytokines were subsequently examined in the amygdala, a key brain region for the modulation of emotion and pain. The OB rats exhibited mechanical and cold allodynia, but not heat hyperalgesia, when compared with sham-operated counterparts. Spinal nerve ligation induced characteristic mechanical and cold allodynia in the ipsilateral hindpaw of both sham and OB rats. The OB rats exhibited a reduced latency and number of responses to an innocuous cold stimulus following SNL, an effect positively correlated with interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 mRNA expression in the amygdala, respectively. Spinal nerve ligation reduced IL-6 and increased IL-10 expression in the amygdala of sham rats. The expression of CD11b (cluster of differentiation molecule 11b) and GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein), indicative of microglial and astrocyte activation, and IL-1β in the amygdala was enhanced in OB animals when compared with sham counterparts, an effect not observed following SNL. This study shows that neuropathic pain-related responding to an innocuous cold stimulus is altered in an animal model of depression, effects accompanied by changes in the expression of neuroinflammatory genes in the amygdala.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 2 3%
Japan 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 63 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 22%
Student > Bachelor 12 18%
Researcher 11 16%
Student > Master 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 23 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 12%
Psychology 7 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 11 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2013.
All research outputs
#11,656,863
of 17,939,704 outputs
Outputs from Genes, Brain & Behavior
#704
of 1,010 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,708
of 170,132 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genes, Brain & Behavior
#12
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,939,704 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,010 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 170,132 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.