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CB1 and CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Antagonists Prevent Minocycline-Induced Neuroprotection Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

Overview of attention for article published in Cerebral Cortex, August 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
wikipedia
11 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
45 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
76 Mendeley
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Title
CB1 and CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Antagonists Prevent Minocycline-Induced Neuroprotection Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice
Published in
Cerebral Cortex, August 2013
DOI 10.1093/cercor/bht202
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. B. Lopez-Rodriguez, E. Siopi, D. P. Finn, C. Marchand-Leroux, L. M. Garcia-Segura, M. Jafarian-Tehrani, M.-P. Viveros

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its consequences represent one of the leading causes of death in young adults. This lesion mediates glial activation and the release of harmful molecules and causes brain edema, axonal injury, and functional impairment. Since glial activation plays a key role in the development of this damage, it seems that controlling it could be beneficial and could lead to neuroprotective effects. Recent studies show that minocycline suppresses microglial activation, reduces the lesion volume, and decreases TBI-induced locomotor hyperactivity up to 3 months. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) plays an important role in reparative mechanisms and inflammation under pathological situations by controlling some mechanisms that are shared with minocycline pathways. We hypothesized that the ECS could be involved in the neuroprotective effects of minocycline. To address this hypothesis, we used a murine TBI model in combination with selective CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists (AM251 and AM630, respectively). The results provided the first evidence for the involvement of ECS in the neuroprotective action of minocycline on brain edema, neurological impairment, diffuse axonal injury, and microglial activation, since all these effects were prevented by the CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 73 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 24%
Researcher 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 12 16%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 5%
Student > Master 4 5%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 14 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 15 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 9%
Chemistry 2 3%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 19 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 100. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2021.
All research outputs
#273,802
of 19,035,438 outputs
Outputs from Cerebral Cortex
#96
of 4,234 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,410
of 172,935 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cerebral Cortex
#1
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,035,438 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,234 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 172,935 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.