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From Particularities to Context: Refining Our Thinking on Illness Narratives

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, March 2017
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23 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
From Particularities to Context: Refining Our Thinking on Illness Narratives
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, March 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.3.msoc1-1703
Pubmed ID
Abstract

This paper examines how illness narratives are used in medical education and their implications for clinicians' thinking and care of patients. Ideally, collecting and reading illness narratives can enhance clinicians' sensitivity and contextual thinking. And yet these narratives have become part of institutionalizing cultural competency requirements in ways that tend to favor standardization. Stereotyping and reductionistic thinking can result from these pedagogic approaches and obscure structural inequities. We end by asking how we might best teach and read illness narratives to fulfill the ethical obligations of listening and asking more informative clinical interview questions that can better meet the needs of patients and the community.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 20%
Student > Master 6 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Researcher 4 7%
Other 14 26%
Unknown 11 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 35%
Social Sciences 6 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 11%
Arts and Humanities 3 6%
Psychology 3 6%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 13 24%