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Empirically derived guidance for social scientists to influence environmental policy

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
222 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
89 Mendeley
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Title
Empirically derived guidance for social scientists to influence environmental policy
Published in
PLoS ONE, March 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0171950
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nadine Marshall, Neil Adger, Simon Attwood, Katrina Brown, Charles Crissman, Christopher Cvitanovic, Cassandra De Young, Margaret Gooch, Craig James, Sabine Jessen, Dave Johnson, Paul Marshall, Sarah Park, Dave Wachenfeld, Damian Wrigley

Abstract

Failure to stem trends of ecological disruption and associated loss of ecosystem services worldwide is partly due to the inadequate integration of the human dimension into environmental decision-making. Decision-makers need knowledge of the human dimension of resource systems and of the social consequences of decision-making if environmental management is to be effective and adaptive. Social scientists have a central role to play, but little guidance exists to help them influence decision-making processes. We distil 348 years of cumulative experience shared by 31 environmental experts across three continents into advice for social scientists seeking to increase their influence in the environmental policy arena. Results focus on the importance of process, engagement, empathy and acumen and reveal the importance of understanding and actively participating in policy processes through co-producing knowledge and building trust. The insights gained during this research might empower a science-driven cultural change in science-policy relations for the routine integration of the human dimension in environmental decision making; ultimately for an improved outlook for earth's ecosystems and the billions of people that depend on them.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 222 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 2%
Finland 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Macao 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Unknown 80 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 19%
Student > Master 9 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Other 7 8%
Other 20 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 25 28%
Social Sciences 23 26%
Unspecified 13 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 13%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 4%
Other 12 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 158. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2018.
All research outputs
#77,842
of 12,477,828 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#1,685
of 136,851 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,068
of 251,774 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#62
of 4,431 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,477,828 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 136,851 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,774 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,431 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.