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Bioturbation determines the response of benthic ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms to ocean acidification

Overview of attention for article published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, October 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
91 Mendeley
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Title
Bioturbation determines the response of benthic ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms to ocean acidification
Published in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, October 2013
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2012.0441
Pubmed ID
Authors

B. Laverock, V. Kitidis, K. Tait, J. A. Gilbert, A. M. Osborn, S. Widdicombe

Abstract

Ocean acidification (OA), caused by the dissolution of increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in seawater, is projected to cause significant changes to marine ecology and biogeochemistry. Potential impacts on the microbially driven cycling of nitrogen are of particular concern. Specifically, under seawater pH levels approximating future OA scenarios, rates of ammonia oxidation (the rate-limiting first step of the nitrification pathway) have been shown to dramatically decrease in seawater, but not in underlying sediments. However, no prior study has considered the interactive effects of microbial ammonia oxidation and macrofaunal bioturbation activity, which can enhance nitrogen transformation rates. Using experimental mesocosms, we investigated the responses to OA of ammonia oxidizing microorganisms inhabiting surface sediments and sediments within burrow walls of the mud shrimp Upogebia deltaura. Seawater was acidified to one of four target pH values (pHT 7.90, 7.70, 7.35 and 6.80) in comparison with a control (pHT 8.10). At pHT 8.10, ammonia oxidation rates in burrow wall sediments were, on average, fivefold greater than in surface sediments. However, at all acidified pH values (pH ≤ 7.90), ammonia oxidation rates in burrow sediments were significantly inhibited (by 79-97%; p < 0.01), whereas rates in surface sediments were unaffected. Both bacterial and archaeal abundances increased significantly as pHT declined; by contrast, relative abundances of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidation (amoA) genes did not vary. This research suggests that OA could cause substantial reductions in total benthic ammonia oxidation rates in coastal bioturbated sediments, leading to corresponding changes in coupled nitrogen cycling between the benthic and pelagic realms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Italy 2 2%
Germany 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 84 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 27%
Researcher 25 27%
Student > Master 11 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 5 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 41 45%
Environmental Science 28 31%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 7 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 September 2013.
All research outputs
#486,488
of 4,507,144 outputs
Outputs from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#534
of 2,191 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,003
of 93,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#6
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,144 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,191 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 93,267 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.