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Evidence for 20th century climate warming and wetland drying in the North American Prairie Pothole Region

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, August 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
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Title
Evidence for 20th century climate warming and wetland drying in the North American Prairie Pothole Region
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, August 2013
DOI 10.1002/ece3.731
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brett A. Werner, W. Carter Johnson, Glenn R. Guntenspergen

Abstract

The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America is a globally important resource that provides abundant and valuable ecosystem goods and services in the form of biodiversity, groundwater recharge, water purification, flood attenuation, and water and forage for agriculture. Numerous studies have found these wetlands, which number in the millions, to be highly sensitive to climate variability. Here, we compare wetland conditions between two 30-year periods (1946-1975; 1976-2005) using a hindcast simulation approach to determine if recent climate warming in the region has already resulted in changes in wetland condition. Simulations using the WETLANDSCAPE model show that 20th century climate change may have been sufficient to have a significant impact on wetland cover cycling. Modeled wetlands in the PPR's western Canadian prairies show the most dramatic effects: a recent trend toward shorter hydroperiods and less dynamic vegetation cycles, which already may have reduced the productivity of hundreds of wetland-dependent species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Cambodia 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 70 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 23%
Student > Master 15 21%
Researcher 15 21%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 5%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 6 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 34%
Environmental Science 22 30%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 12%
Engineering 3 4%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 7 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2013.
All research outputs
#10,210,507
of 18,148,646 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#3,605
of 5,858 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,903
of 171,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#49
of 79 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,148,646 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,858 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 171,051 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 79 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.