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Aspirin treatment for chronic wounds: Potential beneficial and inhibitory effects

Overview of attention for article published in Wound Repair & Regeneration, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
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Title
Aspirin treatment for chronic wounds: Potential beneficial and inhibitory effects
Published in
Wound Repair & Regeneration, January 2017
DOI 10.1111/wrr.12502
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ian Andrew Darby, Carolina Dragica Weller

Abstract

Aspirin is a generally well-tolerated drug that is now widely used in aged patients for its anti-thrombotic action. Aspirin works through several pathways to reduce inflammation, fever and to alter platelet activity. The scientific literature suggests that inhibition of the cyclooxygenase enzymes by aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be deleterious to normal wound repair processes and result in healing inhibition. However, novel effects of aspirin on other pathways that regulate inflammation and repair have been reported more recently. These pathways, including inhibition of inflammatory second messengers and transcription factor pathways and production of anti-inflammatory, pro-resolution factors (lipoxins), provide a possible explanation for beneficial effects of aspirin in chronic wound healing. There have been limited studies to date that provide good evidence to support aspirin use in chronic venous leg ulcers but this may change as we see results from randomized trials that are currently being undertaken. In this paper we look at possible effects that aspirin administration may have on venous leg ulcer healing and the expanding knowledge of potential beneficial effects of aspirin that operate via novel pathways. Though the literature suggests that aspirin treatment and cyclooxygenase inhibition may have deleterious effects in normal healing, it is possible that in chronic wounds that may be trapped in an inflammatory state that aspirin treatment may result in beneficial outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 18%
Student > Master 2 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Lecturer 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 18%
Neuroscience 1 9%
Unknown 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2017.
All research outputs
#6,484,179
of 12,354,561 outputs
Outputs from Wound Repair & Regeneration
#452
of 742 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#107,073
of 260,405 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Wound Repair & Regeneration
#4
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,354,561 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 742 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,405 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.