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Multidirectional abundance shifts among North American birds and the relative influence of multifaceted climate factors

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
Multidirectional abundance shifts among North American birds and the relative influence of multifaceted climate factors
Published in
Global Change Biology, April 2017
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13683
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qiongyu Huang, John R. Sauer, Ralph O. Dubayah

Abstract

Shifts in species distributions are major fingerprint of climate change. Examining changes in species abundance structures at a continental scale enables robust evaluation of climate change influences, but few studies have conducted these evaluations due to limited data and methodological constraints. In this study, we estimate temporal changes in abundance from North American Breeding Bird Survey data at the scale of physiographic strata to examine the relative influence of different components of climatic factors and evaluate the hypothesis that shifting species distributions are multi-directional in resident bird species in North America. We quantify the direction and velocity of the abundance shifts of 57 permanent resident birds over 44 years using a centroid analysis. For species with significant abundance shifts in the centroid analysis, we conduct a more intensive correlative analysis to identify climate components most strongly associated with composite change of abundance within strata. Our hypotheses focus on two contrasts: the relative importance of climate extremes versus averages, and of temperature versus precipitation in strength of association with abundance change. Our study shows that 36 species had significant abundance shifts over the study period. The average velocity of the centroid is 5.89 km·yr(-1) .The shifted distance on average covers 259 km, 9% of range extent. Our results strongly suggest that the climate change fingerprint in studied avian distributions is multidirectional. Among 6 directions with significant abundance shifts, the northwestward shift was observed in the largest number of species (n=13). The temperature/average climate model consistently has greater predictive ability than the precipitation/extreme climate model in explaining strata-level abundance change. Our study shows heterogeneous avian responses to recent environmental changes. It highlights needs for more species-specific approaches to examine contributing factors to recent distributional changes and for comprehensive conservation planning for climate change adaptation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 16%
Student > Master 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 39%
Environmental Science 17 25%
Arts and Humanities 2 3%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 1%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 14 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2017.
All research outputs
#4,323,432
of 16,519,195 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#3,045
of 4,514 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,854
of 263,800 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#85
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,519,195 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,514 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.2. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,800 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.