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Affective traits link to reliable neural markers of incentive anticipation

Overview of attention for article published in NeuroImage, January 2014
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Title
Affective traits link to reliable neural markers of incentive anticipation
Published in
NeuroImage, January 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.08.055
Pubmed ID
Authors

Charlene C. Wu, Gregory R. Samanez-Larkin, Kiefer Katovich, Brian Knutson

Abstract

While theorists have speculated that different affective traits are linked to reliable brain activity during anticipation of gains and losses, few have directly tested this prediction. We examined these associations in a community sample of healthy human adults (n=52) as they played a Monetary Incentive Delay task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). Factor analysis of personality measures revealed that subjects independently varied in trait Positive Arousal and trait Negative Arousal. In a subsample (n=14) retested over 2.5years later, left nucleus accumbens (NAcc) activity during anticipation of large gains (+$5.00) and right anterior insula activity during anticipation of large losses (-$5.00) showed significant test-retest reliability (intraclass correlations>0.50, p's<0.01). In the full sample (n=52), trait Positive Arousal correlated with individual differences in left NAcc activity during anticipation of large gains, while trait Negative Arousal correlated with individual differences in right anterior insula activity during anticipation of large losses. Associations of affective traits with neural activity were not attributable to the influence of other potential confounds (including sex, age, wealth, and motion). Together, these results demonstrate selective links between distinct affective traits and reliably-elicited activity in neural circuits associated with anticipation of gain versus loss. The findings thus reveal neural markers for affective dimensions of healthy personality, and potentially for related psychiatric symptoms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 174 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Japan 2 1%
China 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 165 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 32%
Researcher 31 18%
Student > Master 20 11%
Student > Bachelor 19 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 23 13%
Unknown 17 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 86 49%
Neuroscience 29 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 2%
Social Sciences 4 2%
Other 14 8%
Unknown 28 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2020.
All research outputs
#8,462,184
of 15,384,081 outputs
Outputs from NeuroImage
#6,095
of 9,216 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,607
of 163,878 outputs
Outputs of similar age from NeuroImage
#81
of 134 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,384,081 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,216 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 163,878 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 134 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.