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Energy Level Alignment at Metal/Solution-Processed Organic Semiconductor Interfaces

Overview of attention for article published in Advanced Materials, March 2017
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27 Mendeley
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Title
Energy Level Alignment at Metal/Solution-Processed Organic Semiconductor Interfaces
Published in
Advanced Materials, March 2017
DOI 10.1002/adma.201606901
Pubmed ID
Authors

Atxabal, Ainhoa, Braun, Slawomir, Arnold, Thorsten, Sun, Xiangnan, Parui, Subir, Liu, Xianjie, Gozalvez, Cristian, Llopis, Roger, Mateo‐Alonso, Aurelio, Casanova, Felix, Ortmann, Frank, Fahlman, Mats, Hueso, Luis E.

Abstract

Energy barriers between the metal Fermi energy and the molecular levels of organic semiconductor devoted to charge transport play a fundamental role in the performance of organic electronic devices. Typically, techniques such as electron photoemission spectroscopy, Kelvin probe measurements, and in-device hot-electron spectroscopy have been applied to study these interfacial energy barriers. However, so far there has not been any direct method available for the determination of energy barriers at metal interfaces with n-type polymeric semiconductors. This study measures and compares metal/solution-processed electron-transporting polymer interface energy barriers by in-device hot-electron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy. It not only demonstrates in-device hot-electron spectroscopy as a direct and reliable technique for these studies but also brings it closer to technological applications by working ex situ under ambient conditions. Moreover, this study determines that the contamination layer coming from air exposure does not play any significant role on the energy barrier alignment for charge transport. The theoretical model developed for this work confirms all the experimental observations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Korea, Republic of 1 4%
Unknown 25 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 41%
Researcher 8 30%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Professor 1 4%
Other 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 12 44%
Materials Science 6 22%
Chemistry 5 19%
Engineering 2 7%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 March 2017.
All research outputs
#6,348,615
of 8,366,012 outputs
Outputs from Advanced Materials
#3,192
of 4,429 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#176,424
of 243,629 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advanced Materials
#143
of 168 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,366,012 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,429 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,629 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 168 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.