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Mapping Monkeypox Transmission Risk through Time and Space in the Congo Basin

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
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Title
Mapping Monkeypox Transmission Risk through Time and Space in the Congo Basin
Published in
PLoS ONE, September 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0074816
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yoshinori Nakazawa, R. Ryan Lash, Darin S. Carroll, Inger K. Damon, Kevin L. Karem, Mary G. Reynolds, Jorge E. Osorio, Tonie E. Rocke, Jean M. Malekani, Jean-Jacques Muyembe, Pierre Formenty, A. Townsend Peterson

Abstract

Monkeypox is a major public health concern in the Congo Basin area, with changing patterns of human case occurrences reported in recent years. Whether this trend results from better surveillance and detection methods, reduced proportions of vaccinated vs. non-vaccinated human populations, or changing environmental conditions remains unclear. Our objective is to examine potential correlations between environment and transmission of monkeypox events in the Congo Basin. We created ecological niche models based on human cases reported in the Congo Basin by the World Health Organization at the end of the smallpox eradication campaign, in relation to remotely-sensed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index datasets from the same time period. These models predicted independent spatial subsets of monkeypox occurrences with high confidence; models were then projected onto parallel environmental datasets for the 2000s to create present-day monkeypox suitability maps. Recent trends in human monkeypox infection are associated with broad environmental changes across the Congo Basin. Our results demonstrate that ecological niche models provide useful tools for identification of areas suitable for transmission, even for poorly-known diseases like monkeypox.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
South Africa 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 43 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 26%
Student > Master 9 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Other 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 49%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Unspecified 5 11%
Environmental Science 4 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 6%
Other 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2015.
All research outputs
#3,150,266
of 12,091,568 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#41,876
of 133,031 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,916
of 150,533 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,311
of 3,966 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,091,568 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 133,031 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 150,533 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,966 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.