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Does Bone Resorption Stimulate Periosteal Expansion? A Cross-Sectional Analysis of β-C-telopeptides of Type I Collagen (CTX), Genetic Markers of the RANKL Pathway, and Periosteal Circumference as…

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Bone & Mineral Research, March 2014
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
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1 research highlight platform

Citations

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15 Dimensions

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38 Mendeley
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Title
Does Bone Resorption Stimulate Periosteal Expansion? A Cross-Sectional Analysis of β-C-telopeptides of Type I Collagen (CTX), Genetic Markers of the RANKL Pathway, and Periosteal Circumference as Measured by pQCT
Published in
Journal of Bone & Mineral Research, March 2014
DOI 10.1002/jbmr.2093
Pubmed ID
Authors

John P Kemp, Adrian Sayers, Lavinia Paternoster, David M Evans, Kevin Deere, Beate St Pourcain, Nicholas J Timpson, Susan M Ring, Mattias Lorentzon, Terho Lehtimäki, Joel Eriksson, Mika Kähönen, Olli Raitakari, Marika Laaksonen, Harri Sievänen, Jorma Viikari, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, George Davey Smith, William D Fraser, Liesbeth Vandenput, Claes Ohlsson, Jon H Tobias

Abstract

We hypothesized that bone resorption acts to increase bone strength through stimulation of periosteal expansion. Hence, we examined whether bone resorption, as reflected by serum β-C-telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX), is positively associated with periosteal circumference (PC), in contrast to inverse associations with parameters related to bone remodeling such as cortical bone mineral density (BMDC ). CTX and mid-tibial peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) scans were available in 1130 adolescents (mean age 15.5 years) from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, time of sampling, tanner stage, lean mass, fat mass, and height. CTX was positively related to PC (β=0.19 [0.13, 0.24]) (coefficient=SD change per SD increase in CTX, 95% confidence interval)] but inversely associated with BMDC (β=-0.46 [-0.52,-0.40]) and cortical thickness [β=-0.11 (-0.18, -0.03)]. CTX was positively related to bone strength as reflected by the strength-strain index (SSI) (β=0.09 [0.03, 0.14]). To examine the causal nature of this relationship, we then analyzed whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within key osteoclast regulatory genes, known to reduce areal/cortical BMD, conversely increase PC. Fifteen such genetic variants within or proximal to genes encoding receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK), RANK ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were identified by literature search. Six of the 15 alleles that were inversely related to BMD were positively related to CTX (p<0.05 cut-off) (n=2379). Subsequently, we performed a meta-analysis of associations between these SNPs and PC in ALSPAC (n=3382), Gothenburg Osteoporosis and Obesity Determinants (GOOD) (n=938), and the Young Finns Study (YFS) (n=1558). Five of the 15 alleles that were inversely related to BMD were positively related to PC (p<0.05 cut-off). We conclude that despite having lower BMD, individuals with a genetic predisposition to higher bone resorption have greater bone size, suggesting that higher bone resorption is permissive for greater periosteal expansion.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2014.
All research outputs
#2,702,882
of 12,567,303 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Bone & Mineral Research
#837
of 3,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,855
of 157,110 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Bone & Mineral Research
#6
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,567,303 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,334 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 157,110 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.