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Lumbar lordosis in prone position and prone hip extension test: comparison between subjects with and without low back pain

Overview of attention for article published in Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Lumbar lordosis in prone position and prone hip extension test: comparison between subjects with and without low back pain
Published in
Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12998-017-0139-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amir Massoud Arab, Arash Haghighat, Zahra Amiri, Fariba Khosravi

Abstract

Prone hip extension (PHE) is a common and widely accepted test used for assessment of the lumbo-pelvic movement pattern. Considerable increased in lumbar lordosis during this test has been considered as impairment of movement patterns in lumbo-pelvic region. The purpose of this study was to investigate the change of lumbar lordosis in PHE test in subjects with and without low back pain (LBP). A two-way mixed design with repeated measurements was used to investigate the lumbar lordosis changes during PHE in two groups of subjects with and without LBP. An equal number of subjects (N = 30) were allocated to each group. A standard flexible ruler was used to measure the size of lumbar lordosis in prone-relaxed position and PHE test in each group. The result of two-way mixed-design analysis of variance revealed significant health status by position interaction effect for lumbar lordosis (P < 0.001). The main effect of test position on lumbar lordosis was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The lumbar lordosis was significantly greater in the PHE compared to prone-relaxed position in both subjects with and without LBP. The amount of difference in positions was statistically significant between two groups (P < 0.001) and greater change in lumbar lordosis was found in the healthy group compared to the subjects with LBP. Greater change in lumbar lordosis during this test may be due to more stiffness in lumbopelvic muscles in the individuals with LBP.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 16%
Student > Master 4 13%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 10 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 12 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 16%
Sports and Recreations 3 9%
Philosophy 1 3%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 March 2017.
All research outputs
#1,373,029
of 9,240,924 outputs
Outputs from Chiropractic & Manual Therapies
#102
of 292 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,173
of 255,394 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Chiropractic & Manual Therapies
#4
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,240,924 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 292 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,394 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.