↓ Skip to main content

The Role of Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity and Competition In Structuring Trematode Communities In the Great Pond Snail, Lymnaea stagnalis (L.)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Parasitology, December 2011
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The Role of Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity and Competition In Structuring Trematode Communities In the Great Pond Snail, Lymnaea stagnalis (L.)
Published in
Journal of Parasitology, December 2011
DOI 10.1645/ge-2964.1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Miroslava Soldánová, Armand M. Kuris, Tomáš Scholz, Kevin D. Lafferty, Soldánová M, Kuris A, Scholz T, Lafferty K

Abstract

We assessed how spatial and temporal heterogeneity and competition structure larval trematode communities in the pulmonate snail Lymnaea stagnalis . To postulate a dominance hierarchy, mark-release-recapture was used to monitor replacements of trematode species within snails over time. In addition, we sampled the trematode community in snails in different ponds in 3 consecutive years. A total of 7,623 snails (10,382 capture events) was sampled in 7 fishponds in the Jindřichův Hradec and Třeboň areas in South Bohemia (Czech Republic) from August 2006 to October 2008. Overall, 39% of snails were infected by a community of 14 trematode species; 7% of snails were infected with more than 1 trematode species (constituting 16 double- and 4 triple-species combinations). Results of the null-model analyses suggested that spatial heterogeneity in recruitment among ponds isolated trematode species from each other, whereas seasonal pulses in recruitment increased species interactions in some ponds. Competitive exclusion among trematodes led to a rarity of multiple infections compared to null-model expectations. Competitive relationships among trematode species were hypothesized as a dominance hierarchy based on direct evidence of replacement and invasion and on indirect evidence. Seven top dominant species with putatively similar competitive abilities (6 rediae and 1 sporocyst species) reduced the prevalence of the other trematode species developing in sporocysts only.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 7%
United Kingdom 1 4%
Germany 1 4%
Unknown 23 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 41%
Researcher 5 19%
Student > Master 4 15%
Unspecified 2 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 78%
Environmental Science 3 11%
Unspecified 2 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2013.
All research outputs
#3,068,714
of 4,507,280 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Parasitology
#668
of 800 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,270
of 97,738 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Parasitology
#18
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,280 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 800 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 97,738 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.