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CD4+ T-cell count may not be a useful strategy to monitor antiretroviral therapy response in HTLV-1/HIV co-infected patients.

Overview of attention for article published in Current HIV Research, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 216)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
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Title
CD4+ T-cell count may not be a useful strategy to monitor antiretroviral therapy response in HTLV-1/HIV co-infected patients.
Published in
Current HIV Research, February 2017
DOI 10.2174/1570162x15666170216114917
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alain Vandormael, Filipe Rego, Siva Danaviah, Luiz Alcantara, David Boulware, Tulio de Oliveira

Abstract

HTLV-1/HIV co-infection is known to elevate the CD4+ T-cell counts of treatment-naïve persons. We investigated whether HTLV-1/HIV co-infected patients continued to have elevated CD4+ T-cell counts after developing virologic failure on antiretroviral therapy (ART). The data comes from a drug resistance study located in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. All participants (N=383) presented for repeated CD4+ T-cell count and HIV viral load level testing between January 2006 and March 2014. We used a random-coefficient model to estimate the change in CD4+ T-cell count and HIV viral load level by HTLV-1/HIV co-infection status over time, adjusting for age, sex, and duration of virologic failure. HTLV-1/HIV co-infected participants (n=8) had higher CD4+ T-cell counts, with a positive difference of 117.2 cells/µL at the ART initiation date (p-value=0.001), 114.7 cells/µL (p-value<0.001) 12 months after this date, and 112.3 cells/µL (p-value=0.005) 24 months after this date, holding all else constant. In contrast, there was no difference in the HIV viral load level by HTLV-1/HIV co-infected status throughout the observation period. We show that HTLV-1/HIV co-infected participants continued to have elevated CD4+ T-cell counts after developing virologic failure on ART, despite no difference in their HIV viral load levels when compared with HIV mono-infected participants. Our results indicate that CD4+ T-cell count testing may not be a useful strategy to monitor ART response in the presence of HTLV-1 infection.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Other 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 6 23%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 8 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2017.
All research outputs
#350,842
of 9,222,312 outputs
Outputs from Current HIV Research
#2
of 216 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,720
of 279,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current HIV Research
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,222,312 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 216 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,354 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them