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Strong species-environment feedback shapes plant community assembly along environmental gradients.

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, September 2013
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

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Title
Strong species-environment feedback shapes plant community assembly along environmental gradients.
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, September 2013
DOI 10.1002/ece3.784
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jiang, Jiang, DeAngelis, Donald L., Jiang J, Deangelis DL, Jiang, Donald L. DeAngelis

Abstract

An aim of community ecology is to understand the patterns of competing species assembly along environmental gradients. All species interact with their environments. However, theories of community assembly have seldom taken into account the effects of species that are able to engineer the environment. In this modeling study, we integrate the species' engineering trait together with processes of immigration and local dispersal into a theory of community assembly. We quantify the species' engineering trait as the degree to which it can move the local environment away from its baseline state towards the optimum state of the species (species-environment feedback). We find that, in the presence of immigration from a regional pool, strong feedback can increase local species richness; however, in the absence of continual immigration, species richness is a declining function of the strength of species-environment feedback. This shift from a negative effect of engineering strength on species richness to a positive effect, as immigration rate increases, is clearer when there is spatial heterogeneity in the form of a gradient in environmental conditions than when the environment is homogeneous or it is randomly heterogeneous. Increasing the scale over which local dispersal occurs can facilitate species richness when there is no species-environment feedback or when the feedback is weak. However, increases in the spatial scale of dispersal can reduce species richness when the species-environment feedback is strong. These results expand the theoretical basis for understanding the effects of the strength of species-environment feedback on community assembly.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 6%
Spain 2 3%
Brazil 2 3%
United Kingdom 2 3%
Mexico 1 2%
Switzerland 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Puerto Rico 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 47 76%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 31%
Researcher 13 21%
Student > Master 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Professor 4 6%
Other 13 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 55%
Environmental Science 14 23%
Unspecified 6 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 5%
Physics and Astronomy 2 3%
Other 3 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2014.
All research outputs
#365,656
of 12,863,124 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#126
of 3,679 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,686
of 161,630 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#1
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,863,124 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,679 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 161,630 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.