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Lesions caused by Africanized honeybee stings in three cattle in Brazil

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
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Title
Lesions caused by Africanized honeybee stings in three cattle in Brazil
Published in
Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1678-9199-19-18
Pubmed ID
Authors

Saulo Caldas, Flávio Augusto Soares Graça, Júlia Soares Monteiro de Barros, Márcia Rolim, Tiago da Cunha Peixoto, Paulo Peixoto

Abstract

We report three cases of stings by Africanized bees in cattle in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Erythema, subcutaneous edema, necrosis accompanied by skin detachment, and subsequent skin regeneration were observed, especially on the head and dewlap. Histopathological examinations performed 45 days later revealed complete skin reepithelialization with moderate dermal fibrosis. The clinical picture and differential diagnosis are discussed in the present manuscript, with a focus on photosensitization, which causes cutaneous lesions on the head (sequela) with cicatricial curving of the ears and can be very similar to what is observed in cattle attacked by swarms of bees. The distinction between photosensitization and bee sting lesions can be made with a focus on history and clinical and pathological aspects.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 5 50%
Professor 1 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 10%
Researcher 1 10%
Student > Master 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 10%
Unknown 3 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2021.
All research outputs
#6,927,662
of 21,347,849 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases
#136
of 465 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,399
of 186,170 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,347,849 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 465 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,170 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them