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Role of sirtuins in lifespan regulation is linked to methylation of nicotinamide

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Chemical Biology, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Citations

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122 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
224 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Role of sirtuins in lifespan regulation is linked to methylation of nicotinamide
Published in
Nature Chemical Biology, September 2013
DOI 10.1038/nchembio.1352
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kathrin Schmeisser, Johannes Mansfeld, Doreen Kuhlow, Sandra Weimer, Steffen Priebe, Ines Heiland, Marc Birringer, Marco Groth, Alexandra Segref, Yariv Kanfi, Nathan L Price, Sebastian Schmeisser, Stefan Schuster, Andreas F H Pfeiffer, Reinhard Guthke, Matthias Platzer, Thorsten Hoppe, Haim Y Cohen, Kim Zarse, David A Sinclair, Michael Ristow

Abstract

Sirtuins, a family of histone deacetylases, have a fiercely debated role in regulating lifespan. In contrast with recent observations, here we find that overexpression of sir-2.1, the ortholog of mammalian SirT1, does extend Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan. Sirtuins mandatorily convert NAD(+) into nicotinamide (NAM). We here find that NAM and its metabolite, 1-methylnicotinamide (MNA), extend C. elegans lifespan, even in the absence of sir-2.1. We identify a previously unknown C. elegans nicotinamide-N-methyltransferase, encoded by a gene now named anmt-1, to generate MNA from NAM. Disruption and overexpression of anmt-1 have opposing effects on lifespan independent of sirtuins, with loss of anmt-1 fully inhibiting sir-2.1-mediated lifespan extension. MNA serves as a substrate for a newly identified aldehyde oxidase, GAD-3, to generate hydrogen peroxide, which acts as a mitohormetic reactive oxygen species signal to promote C. elegans longevity. Taken together, sirtuin-mediated lifespan extension depends on methylation of NAM, providing an unexpected mechanistic role for sirtuins beyond histone deacetylation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 224 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
Belgium 3 1%
France 2 <1%
Estonia 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 212 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 58 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 50 22%
Student > Master 29 13%
Student > Bachelor 19 8%
Other 13 6%
Other 41 18%
Unknown 14 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 90 40%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 46 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 31 14%
Chemistry 18 8%
Engineering 4 2%
Other 9 4%
Unknown 26 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 113. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2020.
All research outputs
#166,571
of 15,003,476 outputs
Outputs from Nature Chemical Biology
#63
of 2,460 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,944
of 166,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Chemical Biology
#2
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,003,476 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,460 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 166,983 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.