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Fission-fusion dynamics over large distances in raven non-breeders

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 news outlets
twitter
34 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
Title
Fission-fusion dynamics over large distances in raven non-breeders
Published in
Scientific Reports, March 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-00404-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthias-Claudio Loretto, Richard Schuster, Christian Itty, Pascal Marchand, Fulvio Genero, Thomas Bugnyar

Abstract

The influence of fission-fusion dynamics, i.e., temporal variation in group size and composition, on social complexity has been studied in large-brained mammals that rely on social bonds. Little is known about birds, even though some species like ravens have recently received attention for their socio-cognitive skills and use of social bonds. While raven breeders defend territories year-round, non-breeders roam through large areas and form groups at food sources or night roosts. We here examined the fission-fusion patterns of non-breeding ravens over years, investigating whether birds meet repeatedly either at the same or at different locations. We combined four large datasets: presence-absence observations from two study sites (Austria, Italy) and GPS-tracking of ravens across two study areas (Austria, France). As expected, we found a highly dynamic system in which individuals with long phases of temporary settlement had a high probability of meeting others. Although GPS-tagged ravens spread out over thousands of square kilometres, we found repeated associations between almost half of the possible combinations at different locations. Such a system makes repeated interactions between individuals at different sites possible and likely. High fission-fusion dynamics may thus not hinder but shape the social complexity of ravens and, possibly, other long-term bonded birds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 34 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 26%
Student > Bachelor 9 23%
Student > Master 7 18%
Other 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 59%
Environmental Science 5 13%
Unspecified 4 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Psychology 3 8%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 88. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 December 2017.
All research outputs
#122,474
of 9,227,643 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#1,616
of 45,251 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,675
of 260,377 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#172
of 3,660 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,227,643 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 45,251 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,377 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,660 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.