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Randomized controlled trial of Triple P for parents of children with asthma or eczema: Effects on parenting and child behavior.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, January 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
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4 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Randomized controlled trial of Triple P for parents of children with asthma or eczema: Effects on parenting and child behavior.
Published in
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, January 2017
DOI 10.1037/ccp0000177
Pubmed ID
Authors

Morawska, Alina, Mitchell, Amy, Burgess, Scott, Fraser, Jennifer, Alina Morawska, Amy Mitchell, Scott Burgess, Jennifer Fraser

Abstract

Parents play an important role in children's illness management, in promoting child adjustment and reducing behavior problems. Little research has focused on the evaluation of parenting interventions in the context of childhood chronic illness. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of a brief, group parenting intervention (Healthy Living Triple P) in improving parenting skills and parent adjustment, and reducing child behavioral and emotional difficulties in the context of childhood asthma and eczema. One hundred seven parents of children with a diagnosis of asthma and/or eczema were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 52) or care as usual (CAU; n = 55). Parents completed self-report measures of their child's behavioral and emotional adjustment, their own parenting, and their own level of adjustment at pre- and postintervention and at 6-month follow-up. Parent-child interactions were observed and coded at each time point. The intervention consisted of 2 group sessions of 2 hr each delivered by trained, accredited practitioners. Attrition was low, with T2 and T3 assessment completed by 84.6% and 80.8% of intervention families and 92.7% and 81.8% of CAU families, respectively. Intention-to-treat analyses indicated that overall parent-reported ineffective parenting as well as parental overreactivity reduced as a result of intervention. Parent report of child behavior problems also decreased, but there were no changes in children's emotional adjustment. No changes in observed parent or child behavior were found. Stress reduced for parents in the intervention group compared to the CAU group, but there were no changes in parental anxiety or depression. Effects showed evidence of reliable and clinical change and were maintained at 6-month follow-up. The intervention shows promise as an addition to clinical services for children with asthma and eczema and may have broader application to other chronic health conditions. (PsycINFO Database Record

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 18%
Unspecified 5 15%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Other 8 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 20 61%
Unspecified 7 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2017.
All research outputs
#6,617,945
of 11,817,206 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
#2,018
of 3,718 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,727
of 264,840 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
#5
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,817,206 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,718 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,840 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.