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Holocene dynamics of the Florida Everglades with respect to climate, dustfall, and tropical storms

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
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Title
Holocene dynamics of the Florida Everglades with respect to climate, dustfall, and tropical storms
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2013
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1222239110
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul H. Glaser, Barbara C. S. Hansen, Joe J. Donovan, Thomas J. Givnish, Craig A. Stricker, John C. Volin

Abstract

Aeolian dust is rarely considered an important source for nutrients in large peatlands, which generally develop in moist regions far from the major centers of dust production. As a result, past studies assumed that the Everglades provides a classic example of an originally oligotrophic, P-limited wetland that was subsequently degraded by anthropogenic activities. However, a multiproxy sedimentary record indicates that changes in atmospheric circulation patterns produced an abrupt shift in the hydrology and dust deposition in the Everglades over the past 4,600 y. A wet climatic period with high loadings of aeolian dust prevailed before 2800 cal BP (calibrated years before present) when vegetation typical of a deep slough dominated the principal drainage outlet of the Everglades. This dust was apparently transported from distant source areas, such as the Sahara Desert, by tropical storms according to its elemental chemistry and mineralogy. A drier climatic regime with a steep decline in dustfall persisted after 2800 cal BP maintaining sawgrass vegetation at the coring site as tree islands developed nearby (and pine forests covered adjacent uplands). The marked decline in dustfall was related to corresponding declines in sedimentary phosphorus, organic nitrogen, and organic carbon, suggesting that a close relationship existed between dustfall, primary production, and possibly, vegetation patterning before the 20th century. The climatic change after 2800 cal BP was probably produced by a shift in the Bermuda High to the southeast, shunting tropical storms to the south of Florida into the Gulf of Mexico.

Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 67 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 20%
Student > Master 13 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Professor 7 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 10%
Other 16 23%
Unknown 5 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 21 30%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 17 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 19%
Engineering 3 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 1%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 11 16%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2024.
All research outputs
#3,273,093
of 24,625,114 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#34,483
of 101,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,295
of 215,056 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#398
of 908 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,625,114 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 101,438 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 38.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 215,056 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 908 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.