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The Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Controls Circadian Energy Metabolism and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetes, December 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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87 Dimensions

Readers on

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119 Mendeley
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Title
The Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Controls Circadian Energy Metabolism and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity
Published in
Diabetes, December 2012
DOI 10.2337/db12-0507
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. P. Coomans, S. A. A. van den Berg, E. A. Lucassen, T. Houben, A. C. M. Pronk, R. D. van der Spek, A. Kalsbeek, N. R. Biermasz, K. Willems van Dijk, J. A. Romijn, J. H. Meijer

Abstract

Disturbances in the circadian system are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here, we studied the direct contribution of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the central pacemaker in the circadian system, in the development of insulin resistance. Exclusive bilateral SCN lesions in male C57Bl/6J mice, as verified by immunochemistry, showed a small but significant increase in body weight (+17%), which was accounted for by an increase in fat mass. In contrast, mice with collateral damage to the ventromedial hypothalamus and paraventricular nucleus showed severe obesity and insulin resistance. Mice with exclusive SCN ablation revealed a loss of circadian rhythm in activity, oxygen consumption, and food intake. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp analysis 8 weeks after lesioning showed that the glucose infusion rate was significantly lower in SCN lesioned mice compared with sham-operated mice (-63%). Although insulin potently inhibited endogenous glucose production (-84%), this was greatly reduced in SCN lesioned mice (-7%), indicating severe hepatic insulin resistance. Our data show that SCN malfunctioning plays an important role in the disturbance of energy balance and suggest that an absence of central clock activity, in a genetically intact animal, may lead to the development of insulin resistance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Russian Federation 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Unknown 111 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 24%
Student > Master 20 17%
Researcher 14 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 10%
Other 11 9%
Other 34 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 49 41%
Medicine and Dentistry 26 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 10%
Neuroscience 10 8%
Unspecified 10 8%
Other 12 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2014.
All research outputs
#2,767,069
of 12,336,133 outputs
Outputs from Diabetes
#1,978
of 6,859 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,298
of 164,090 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetes
#9
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,336,133 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,859 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 164,090 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.