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Using occupancy models to investigate the prevalence of ectoparasitic vectors on hosts: An example with fleas on prairie dogs

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife, December 2013
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

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4 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

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92 Mendeley
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Title
Using occupancy models to investigate the prevalence of ectoparasitic vectors on hosts: An example with fleas on prairie dogs
Published in
International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife, December 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.ijppaw.2013.09.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

David A. Eads, Dean E. Biggins, Paul F. Doherty, Kenneth L. Gage, Kathryn P. Huyvaert, Dustin H. Long, Michael F. Antolin

Abstract

Ectoparasites are often difficult to detect in the field. We developed a method that can be used with occupancy models to estimate the prevalence of ectoparasites on hosts, and to investigate factors that influence rates of ectoparasite occupancy while accounting for imperfect detection. We describe the approach using a study of fleas (Siphonaptera) on black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). During each primary occasion (monthly trapping events), we combed a prairie dog three consecutive times to detect fleas (15 s/combing). We used robust design occupancy modeling to evaluate hypotheses for factors that might correlate with the occurrence of fleas on prairie dogs, and factors that might influence the rate at which prairie dogs are colonized by fleas. Our combing method was highly effective; dislodged fleas fell into a tub of water and could not escape, and there was an estimated 99.3% probability of detecting a flea on an occupied host when using three combings. While overall detection was high, the probability of detection was always <1.00 during each primary combing occasion, highlighting the importance of considering imperfect detection. The combing method (removal of fleas) caused a decline in detection during primary occasions, and we accounted for that decline to avoid inflated estimates of occupancy. Regarding prairie dogs, flea occupancy was heightened in old/natural colonies of prairie dogs, and on hosts that were in poor condition. Occupancy was initially low in plots with high densities of prairie dogs, but, as the study progressed, the rate of flea colonization increased in plots with high densities of prairie dogs in particular. Our methodology can be used to improve studies of ectoparasites, especially when the probability of detection is low. Moreover, the method can be modified to investigate the co-occurrence of ectoparasite species, and community level factors such as species richness and interspecific interactions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
United States 1 1%
Madagascar 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Unknown 87 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 21%
Researcher 14 15%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 15 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 46 50%
Environmental Science 11 12%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 5%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 15 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2013.
All research outputs
#8,555,972
of 15,543,888 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife
#210
of 401 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,192
of 170,710 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,543,888 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 401 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 170,710 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them