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Arbitrarily applicable spatial relational responding

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Arbitrarily applicable spatial relational responding
Published in
Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, March 2017
DOI 10.1002/jeab.250
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richard J. May, Ian Stewart, Luisa Baez, Gary Freegard, Simon Dymond

Abstract

Spatial reasoning, where novel spatial relationships are inferred based on trained relationships, can be conceptualized as arbitrarily applicable spatial relational responding. Here, we conducted two experiments to develop and validate, for the first time, a laboratory procedure to establish arbitrarily applicable spatial relational responding in adult humans. In Experiment 1, participants were trained on nonarbitrary spatial relational tasks designed to establish contextual cues for left of, right of, above, and below. Contextual cues were then used to train a series of arbitrary spatial relations involving four abstract shapes. Following training in a subset of arbitrary relations (A is left of B, B is above C, C is right of D), subsequent testing examined the emergence of untrained spatial relations (B is right of A, C is below B, D is left of C, D is below A and A is above D). When absent in initial tests, spatial relational responding was facilitated by a remedial training procedure incorporating nonarbitrary relational guidance. Participants showed patterns of spatial relational responding consistent with test relations. In Experiment 2, a variant reversal design yielded predictable, reversed spatial relational responses. Overall, the present procedures represent the first empirical demonstration of arbitrarily applicable spatial relational responding and thus, arguably, the first functional analytic model of spatial reasoning.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Lecturer 2 14%
Researcher 2 14%
Other 2 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 14%
Other 4 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 86%
Arts and Humanities 1 7%
Social Sciences 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2017.
All research outputs
#2,387,145
of 13,289,979 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior
#76
of 556 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,127
of 261,774 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior
#3
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,289,979 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 556 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,774 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.