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Oxytocin in corticosterone-induced chronic stress model: Focus on adrenal gland function

Overview of attention for article published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, June 2017
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Title
Oxytocin in corticosterone-induced chronic stress model: Focus on adrenal gland function
Published in
Psychoneuroendocrinology, June 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.03.011
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dušanka Stanić, Bosiljka Plećaš-Solarović, Duško Mirković, Predrag Jovanović, Slađana Dronjak, Bojan Marković, Tea Đorđević, Svetlana Ignjatović, Vesna Pešić

Abstract

Chronic stress conditions can lead to considerable and extensible changes in physiological and psychological performances, and in emergence of risk for various somatic diseases. On the other hand, the neuropeptide oxytocin is reported to increase the resistance of the organism to stress and modulate activity of autonomic nervous system. Chronic corticosterone administration is used as a rat model for a state observed in terms of chronic stress exposure, when negative feedback mechanism of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis activity is disrupted. In our study, we aimed to investigate whether chronic administration of oxytocin (10 IU/400μL/day for 14days, s.c.) influenced adrenal gland morphology and activity in adult male Wistar rats during long-term corticosterone administration via drinking water (100mg/L for 21days). We examined the influence of treatments on the levels of adrenal gland hormones, corticosterone, adrenaline and noradrenaline, as well as their response to an acute stress challenge evoked by 15-min forced swimming. In addition, the expression of two main monoamine transporters, the noradrenaline transporter (NAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in adrenal medulla was measured in the rats exposed to acute stress. Our results showed that oxytocin treatment prevented corticosterone-induced decrease in body weight gain, attenuated adrenal gland atrophy by increasing glandular weight, and the area of the zona fasciculate and reticularis. Chronic corticosterone intake blunted the response of all measured hormones to acute stress, whereas concomitant oxytocin treatment reversed adrenaline and noradrenaline response to acute stress. Furthermore, in adrenal medulla, oxytocin produced significant vasodilatation and stimulated expression of both catecholamine transporters detected both on mRNA and protein level. Our data suggest that oxytocin, by reducing atrophy of adrenal gland, and by increasing catecholamine storage capacity, may be beneficial in conditions accompanied with high glucocorticoid levels, such as chronic stress exposure.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Unknown 60 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Student > Master 10 16%
Researcher 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 9 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 23%
Psychology 9 15%
Neuroscience 7 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 15 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2017.
All research outputs
#12,842,614
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Psychoneuroendocrinology
#2,523
of 2,960 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#225,934
of 263,677 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychoneuroendocrinology
#77
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,960 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.