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The combination of gas-phase fluorophore technology and automation to enable high-throughput analysis of plant respiration

Overview of attention for article published in Plant Methods, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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36 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
The combination of gas-phase fluorophore technology and automation to enable high-throughput analysis of plant respiration
Published in
Plant Methods, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13007-017-0169-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew P. Scafaro, A. Clarissa A. Negrini, Brendan O’Leary, F. Azzahra Ahmad Rashid, Lucy Hayes, Yuzhen Fan, You Zhang, Vincent Chochois, Murray R. Badger, A. Harvey Millar, Owen K. Atkin

Abstract

Mitochondrial respiration in the dark (Rdark) is a critical plant physiological process, and hence a reliable, efficient and high-throughput method of measuring variation in rates of Rdark is essential for agronomic and ecological studies. However, currently methods used to measure Rdark in plant tissues are typically low throughput. We assessed a high-throughput automated fluorophore system of detecting multiple O2 consumption rates. The fluorophore technique was compared with O2-electrodes, infrared gas analysers (IRGA), and membrane inlet mass spectrometry, to determine accuracy and speed of detecting respiratory fluxes. The high-throughput fluorophore system provided stable measurements of Rdark in detached leaf and root tissues over many hours. High-throughput potential was evident in that the fluorophore system was 10 to 26-fold faster per sample measurement than other conventional methods. The versatility of the technique was evident in its enabling: (1) rapid screening of Rdark in 138 genotypes of wheat; and, (2) quantification of rarely-assessed whole-plant Rdark through dissection and simultaneous measurements of above- and below-ground organs. Variation in absolute Rdark was observed between techniques, likely due to variation in sample conditions (i.e. liquid vs. gas-phase, open vs. closed systems), indicating that comparisons between studies using different measuring apparatus may not be feasible. However, the high-throughput protocol we present provided similar values of Rdark to the most commonly used IRGA instrument currently employed by plant scientists. Together with the greater than tenfold increase in sample processing speed, we conclude that the high-throughput protocol enables reliable, stable and reproducible measurements of Rdark on multiple samples simultaneously, irrespective of plant or tissue type.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 18%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 10 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 51%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 10%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 11 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,138,472
of 9,734,985 outputs
Outputs from Plant Methods
#51
of 388 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,760
of 261,005 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Plant Methods
#7
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,734,985 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 388 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,005 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.