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Exercise training in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: a controlled randomized trial

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, January 2013
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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31 Dimensions

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76 Mendeley
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Title
Exercise training in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: a controlled randomized trial
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/ar4205
Pubmed ID
Authors

Danilo ML Prado, Fabiana B Benatti, Ana L de Sá-Pinto, Ana P Hayashi, Bruno Gualano, Rosa MR Pereira, Adriana ME Sallum, Eloisa Bonfá, Clovis A Silva, Hamilton Roschel

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Exercise training has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy to counteract physical dysfunction in adult systemic lupus erythematosus. However, no longitudinal studies have evaluated the effects of an exercise training program in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) patients. The objective was to evaluate the safety and the efficacy of a supervised aerobic training program in improving the cardiorespiratory capacity in C-SLE patients. METHODS: Nineteen physically inactive C-SLE patients were randomly assigned into two groups: trained (TR, n = 10, supervised moderate-intensity aerobic exercise program) and non-trained (NT, n = 9). Gender-, body mass index (BMI)- and age-matched healthy children were recruited as controls (C, n = 10) for baseline (PRE) measurements only. C-SLE patients were assessed at PRE and after 12 weeks of training (POST). Main measurements included exercise tolerance and cardiorespiratory measurements in response to a maximal exercise (that is, peak VO2, chronotropic reserve (CR), and the heart rate recovery (ΔHRR) (that is, the difference between HR at peak exercise and at both the first (ΔHRR1) and second (ΔHRR2) minutes of recovery after exercise). RESULTS: The C-SLE NT patients did not present changes in any of the cardiorespiratory parameters at POST (P > 0.05). In contrast, the exercise training program was effective in promoting significant increases in time-to-exhaustion (P = 0.01; ES = 1.07), peak speed (P = 0.01; ES = 1.08), peak VO2 (P = 0.04; ES = 0.86), CR (P = 0.06; ES = 0.83), and in ΔHRR1 and ΔHRR2 (P = 0.003; ES = 1.29 and P = 0.0008; ES = 1.36, respectively) in the C-SLE TR when compared with the NT group. Moreover, cardiorespiratory parameters were comparable between C-SLE TR patients and C subjects after the exercise training intervention, as evidenced by the ANOVA analysis (P > 0.05, TR vs. C). SLEDAI-2K scores remained stable throughout the study. CONCLUSION: A 3-month aerobic exercise training was safe and capable of ameliorating the cardiorespiratory capacity and the autonomic function in C-SLE patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01515163.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 74 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 21%
Student > Bachelor 13 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Researcher 8 11%
Other 5 7%
Other 16 21%
Unknown 8 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 36%
Sports and Recreations 11 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 11 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2013.
All research outputs
#856,173
of 5,036,908 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#310
of 1,217 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,735
of 106,440 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#14
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,036,908 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,217 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 106,440 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.