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Fluorescent Methods for Molecular Motors

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 13: Using Fluorescence to Study Actomyosin in Yeasts
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Chapter title
Using Fluorescence to Study Actomyosin in Yeasts
Chapter number 13
Book title
Fluorescent Methods for Molecular Motors
Published in
EXS, July 2014
DOI 10.1007/978-3-0348-0856-9_13
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-03-480855-2, 978-3-03-480856-9
Authors

Mulvihill, Daniel P., Daniel P. Mulvihill

Abstract

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the first description of the cellular distribution of actin within a yeast cell. Since then advances in both molecular genetics and imaging technologies have ensured research within these simple model organisms has blazed a trail in the field of actomyosin research. Many yeast proteins and their functions are functionally conserved in human cells. This, combined with experimental speed, minimal cost and ease of use make the yeasts extremely attractive model organisms for researching diverse cellular processes, including those involving actomyosin. In this chapter, current state-of-the-art fluorescence methodologies being applied to yeast actomyosin research, together with an honest appraisal of their limitations, such as the pitfalls that should be considered when fluorescently labelling proteins interacting within a dynamic cytoskeleton, will be discussed. Papers describing the established techniques developed for yeast localisation studies will be highlighted. This will provide the reader with an informed overview of the arsenal of imaging techniques available to the yeast actomyosin researcher and encourage them to consider novel ways these simple unicellular eukaryotes could be used to address their own research questions.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

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Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 2 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 1 50%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 100%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2014.
All research outputs
#20,233,547
of 22,759,618 outputs
Outputs from EXS
#82
of 93 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#191,341
of 226,887 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EXS
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,759,618 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 93 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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