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THE INNATE IMMUNE RESPONSE MAY BE IMPORTANT FOR SURVIVING PLAGUE IN WILD GUNNISON'S PRAIRIE DOGS

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Wildlife Diseases, October 2013
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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57 Mendeley
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Title
THE INNATE IMMUNE RESPONSE MAY BE IMPORTANT FOR SURVIVING PLAGUE IN WILD GUNNISON'S PRAIRIE DOGS
Published in
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, October 2013
DOI 10.7589/2012-08-209
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joseph D. Busch, Roger Van Andel, Nathan E. Stone, Kacy R. Cobble, Roxanne Nottingham, Judy Lee, Michael VerSteeg, Jeff Corcoran, Jennifer Cordova, William Van Pelt, Megan M. Shuey, Jeffrey T. Foster, James M. Schupp, Stephen Beckstrom-Sternberg, James Beckstrom-Sternberg, Paul Keim, Susan Smith, Julia Rodriguez-Ramos, Judy L. Williamson, Tonie E. Rocke, David M. Wagner

Abstract

Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) are highly susceptible to Yersinia pestis, with ≥99% mortality reported from multiple studies of plague epizootics. A colony of Gunnison's prairie dogs (Cynomys gunnisoni) in the Aubrey Valley (AV) of northern Arizona appears to have survived several regional epizootics of plague, whereas nearby colonies have been severely affected by Y. pestis. To examine potential mechanisms accounting for survival in the AV colony, we conducted a laboratory Y. pestis challenge experiment on 60 wild-caught prairie dogs from AV and from a nearby, large colony with frequent past outbreaks of plague, Espee (n = 30 per colony). Test animals were challenged subcutaneously with the fully virulent Y. pestis strain CO92 at three doses: 50, 5,000, and 50,000 colony-forming units (cfu); this range is lethal in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). Contrary to our expectations, only 40% of the animals died. Although mortality trended higher in the Espee colony (50%) compared with AV (30%), the differences among infectious doses were not statistically significant. Only 39% of the survivors developed moderate to high antibody levels to Y. pestis, indicating that mechanisms other than humoral immunity are important in resistance to plague. The ratio of neutrophils to lymphocytes was not correlated with plague survival in this study. However, several immune proteins with roles in innate immunity (VCAM-1, CXCL-1, and vWF) were upregulated during plague infection and warrant further inquiry into their role for protection against this disease. These results suggest plague resistance exists in wild populations of the Gunnison's prairie dog and provide important directions for future studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Madagascar 1 2%
Unknown 54 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 26%
Researcher 12 21%
Other 11 19%
Student > Master 7 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 3 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 18%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 11%
Environmental Science 4 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 5 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2016.
All research outputs
#1,767,824
of 7,382,271 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#126
of 652 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,281
of 139,907 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#6
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,382,271 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 62nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 652 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 139,907 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.