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Impaired recognition memory and cognitive flexibility in the rat L5–L6 spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Pain, January 2016
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Title
Impaired recognition memory and cognitive flexibility in the rat L5–L6 spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Pain, January 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.sjpain.2015.09.008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Orla Moriarty, Claire L. Gorman, Fiona McGowan, Gemma K. Ford, Michelle Roche, Kerry Thompson, Peter Dockery, Brian E. McGuire, David P. Finn

Abstract

Although neuropathic pain is known to negatively affect cognition, the neural mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Chronic pain is associated with changes in synaptic plasticity in the brain which may impact on cognitive functioning. The aim of this study was to model neuropathic pain in mid-aged rats using spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Following establishment of allodynia and hyperalgesia, behaviour was assessed in a battery of cognitive tests. Expression of the presynaptic protein, synaptophysin, and its colocalisation with the vesicular GABA and glutamate transporters (vGAT and vGLUT, respectively), was investigated in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus. Nine month old male Sprague Dawley rats underwent L5-L6 spinal nerve ligation or a sham procedure. Mechanical and cold allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed using von Frey, acetone and Hargreaves tests, respectively. Cognition was assessed in the novel-object recognition, air-puff passive avoidance and Morris water maze behavioural tasks. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of synaptophysin in the mPFC and CA1 region of the hippocampus and double labelling of synaptophysin and the vesicular transporters vGAT and vGlut was used to investigate the distribution of synaptophysin on GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. SNL rats displayed impaired performance in the novel-object recognition task. Passive-avoidance responding, and spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze, were unaffected by SNL surgery. However, in the water maze reversal task, pain-related impairments were evident during training and probe trials. SNL surgery was not associated with any differences in the expression of synaptophysin or its colocalisation with vGAT or vGLUT in the mPFC or the hippocampal CA1 region. These results suggest that the SNL model of neuropathic pain is associated with deficits in recognition memory and cognitive flexibility, but these deficits are not associated with altered synaptophysin expression or distribution in the mPFC and CA1. Cognitive complaints are common amongst chronic pain patients. Here we modelled cognitive impairment in a well-established animal model of neuropathic pain and investigated the neural mechanisms involved. A better understanding of this phenomenon is an important prerequisite for the development of improved treatment of patients affected.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 4%
Unknown 25 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 31%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 15%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 9 35%
Psychology 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 5 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2017.
All research outputs
#11,082,190
of 12,463,916 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Pain
#286
of 348 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,613
of 257,467 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Pain
#17
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,463,916 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 348 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,467 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.