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Greater role for Atlantic inflows on sea-ice loss in the Eurasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean

Overview of attention for article published in Science, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
37 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
48 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
86 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
185 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Greater role for Atlantic inflows on sea-ice loss in the Eurasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean
Published in
Science, April 2017
DOI 10.1126/science.aai8204
Pubmed ID
Authors

Igor V. Polyakov, Andrey V. Pnyushkov, Matthew B. Alkire, Igor M. Ashik, Till M. Baumann, Eddy C. Carmack, Ilona Goszczko, John Guthrie, Vladimir V. Ivanov, Torsten Kanzow, Richard Krishfield, Ronald Kwok, Arild Sundfjord, James Morison, Robert Rember, Alexander Yulin

Abstract

Arctic sea-ice loss is a leading indicator of climate change and can be attributed, in large part, to atmospheric forcing. Here, we show that recent ice reductions, weakening of the halocline, and shoaling of intermediate-depth Atlantic Water layer in the eastern Eurasian Basin have increased winter ventilation in the ocean interior, making this region structurally similar to that of the western Eurasian Basin. The associated enhanced release of oceanic heat has reduced winter sea-ice formation at a rate now comparable to losses from atmospheric thermodynamic forcing, thus explaining the recent reduction in sea-ice cover in the eastern Eurasian Basin. This encroaching "atlantification" of the Eurasian Basin represents an essential step toward a new Arctic climate state, with a substantially greater role for Atlantic inflows.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 48 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 185 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 180 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 47 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 45 24%
Student > Master 28 15%
Unspecified 25 14%
Student > Bachelor 13 7%
Other 27 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 84 45%
Environmental Science 33 18%
Unspecified 31 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 13%
Physics and Astronomy 4 2%
Other 9 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 377. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2019.
All research outputs
#26,318
of 12,886,920 outputs
Outputs from Science
#1,263
of 60,519 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,470
of 258,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#62
of 970 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,886,920 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 60,519 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 42.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,564 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 970 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.