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Repeated lumbar or ventricular punctures in newborns with intraventricular haemorrhage

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, April 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

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14 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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8 Dimensions

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95 Mendeley
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Title
Repeated lumbar or ventricular punctures in newborns with intraventricular haemorrhage
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, April 2017
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd000216.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew Whitelaw, Richard Lee-Kelland

Abstract

Although in recent years the percentage of preterm infants who suffer intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) has reduced, posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) remains a serious problem with a high rate of cerebral palsy and no evidence-based treatment. Survivors often have to undergo ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) surgery, which makes the child permanently dependent on a valve and catheter system. This carries a significant risk of infection and the need for surgical revision of the shunt. Repeated removal of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by either lumbar puncture, ventricular puncture, or from a ventricular reservoir in preterm babies with IVH has been suggested as a treatment to reduce the risk of PHH development. To determine the effect of repeated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) removal (by lumbar/ventricular puncture or removal from a ventricular reservoir) compared to conservative management, where removal is limited to when there are signs of raised intracranial pressure (ICP), on reduction in the risk of permanent shunt dependence, neurodevelopmental disability, and death in neonates with or at risk of developing posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH). We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 3), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 24 March 2016), Embase (1980 to 24 March 2016), and CINAHL (1982 to 24 March 2016). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs. RCTs and quasi-RCTs that compared serial removal of CSF (via lumbar puncture, ventricular puncture, or from a ventricular reservoir) with conservative management (removing CSF only when there were symptoms of raised ICP). Trials also had to report on at least one of the specified outcomes of death, disability, or shunt insertion. We extracted details of the participant selection, participant allocation and the interventions. We assessed the following outcomes: VPS, death, death or shunt, disability, multiple disability, death or disability, and CSF infection. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. Four trials (five articles) met the inclusion criteria of this review; three were RCTs and one was a quasi-RCT; and included a total of 280 participants treated in neonatal intensive care units in the UK. The trials were published between 1980 and 1990. The studies were sufficiently similar regarding the research question they asked and the interventions that we could combine the trials to assess the effect of the intervention.Meta-analysis showed that the intervention produced no significant difference when compared to conservative management for the outcomes of: placement of hydrocephalus shunt (typical risk ratio (RR) 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73 to 1.26; 3 trials, 233 infants; I² statistic = 0%; moderate quality evidence), death (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.44; 4 trials, 280 infants; I² statistic = 0%; low quality evidence), major disability in survivors (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.18; 2 trials, 141 infants; I² statistic = 11%; high quality evidence), multiple disability in survivors (RR 0.9, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.24; 2 trials, 141 infants; I² statistic = 0%; high quality evidence), death or disability (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.14; 2 trials, 180 infants; I² statistic = 0%; high quality evidence), death or shunt (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.11; 3 trials, 233 infants; I² statistic = 0%; moderate quality evidence), and infection of CSF presurgery (RR 1.73, 95% CI 0.53 to 5.67; 2 trials, 195 infants; low quality evidence).We assessed the quality of the evidence as high for the outcomes of major disability, multiple disability, and disability or death. We rated the evidence for the outcomes of shunt insertion, and death or shunt insertion as of moderate quality as one included trial used an alternation method of randomisation. For the outcomes of death and infection of CSF presurgery, the quality of the evidence was low as one trial used an alternation method, the number of participants was too low to assess the objectives with sufficient precision, and there was inconsistency regarding the findings in the included trials regarding the outcome of infection of CSF presurgery. There was no evidence that repeated removal of CSF via lumbar puncture, ventricular puncture or from a ventricular reservoir produces any benefit over conservative management in neonates with or at risk for developing PHH in terms of reduction of disability, death, or need for placement of a permanent shunt.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 95 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 95 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 22%
Unspecified 14 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 13%
Student > Postgraduate 10 11%
Researcher 9 9%
Other 29 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 54 57%
Unspecified 18 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 6%
Social Sciences 5 5%
Neuroscience 3 3%
Other 9 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2019.
All research outputs
#1,790,504
of 13,190,464 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#4,403
of 10,519 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,880
of 262,949 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#125
of 256 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,190,464 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,519 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,949 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 256 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.