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The ‘One in a Million’ study: creating a database of UK primary care consultations

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
90 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
5 Mendeley
Title
The ‘One in a Million’ study: creating a database of UK primary care consultations
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, April 2017
DOI 10.3399/bjgp17x690521
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcus Jepson, Chris Salisbury, Matthew J Ridd, Chris Metcalfe, Ludivine Garside, Rebecca K Barnes

Abstract

Around 1 million primary care consultations happen in England every day. Despite this, much of what happens in these visits remains a 'black box'.Aim To create an archive of videotaped consultations and linked data based on a large sample of routine face-to-face doctor-patient consultations with consent for use in future research and training.Design and setting Cross-sectional study in 12 general practices in the west of England, UK. Up to two GPs from each practice took part in the study. Over 1 to 2 days, consecutive patients were approached until up to 20 eligible patients for each GP consented to be videotaped. Eligible patients were aged ≥18 years, consulting on their own behalf, fluent in English, and with capacity to consent. GP questionnaires were self-administered. Patient questionnaires were self-administered immediately pre-consultation and post-consultation, and GPs filled in a checklist after each recording. A follow-up questionnaire was sent to patients after 10 days, and data about subsequent related consultations were collected from medical records 3 months later. Of the 485 patients approached, 421 (86.8%) were eligible. Of the eligible patients, 334 (79.3%) consented to participate and 327 consultations with 23 GPs were successfully taped (307 video, 20 audio-only). Most patients (n = 300, 89.8%) consented to use by other researchers, subject to specific ethical approval. Most patients were willing to allow their consultations to be videotaped, and, with very few exceptions, to allow recordings and linked data to be stored in a data repository for future use for research and training.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 90 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 20%
Unknown 4 80%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 60%
Student > Master 1 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 2 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 40%
Engineering 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 75. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2017.
All research outputs
#136,898
of 8,822,256 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#53
of 2,067 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,935
of 258,211 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#8
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,822,256 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,067 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,211 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.