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Evaluating the efficacy of different types of stem cells in preserving gut barrier function in necrotizing enterocolitis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Surgical Research, June 2017
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Title
Evaluating the efficacy of different types of stem cells in preserving gut barrier function in necrotizing enterocolitis
Published in
Journal of Surgical Research, June 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.jss.2017.03.026
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher J. McCulloh, Jacob K. Olson, Yijie Wang, Jennifer Vu, Sarah Gartner, Gail E. Besner

Abstract

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. Increased intestinal permeability is central to NEC development. We have shown that stem cells (SCs) can reduce the incidence and severity of NEC. Our current goal was to investigate the efficacy of four different types of SC in preservation of gut barrier function during NEC. We compared (1) amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal SC, (2) bone marrow-derived mesenchymal SC, (3) amniotic fluid-derived neural SC, and (4) enteric neural SC. Premature rat pups received an intraperitoneal injection of 2 × 10(6) SC or phosphate-buffered saline only and were then subjected to experimental NEC. Control pups were breastfed and not subjected to NEC. After 48 h, animals received a single enteral dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate -labeled dextran (FD70), were sacrificed 4 h later, and serum FD70 concentrations determined. Compared to breastfed, unstressed pups with intact gut barrier function and normal intestinal permeability (serum FD70 concentration 2.22 ± 0.271 μg/mL), untreated pups exposed to NEC had impaired barrier function with significantly increased permeability (18.6 ± 4.25 μg/mL, P = 0.047). Pups exposed to NEC but treated with SC had significantly reduced intestinal permeability: Amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal SC (9.45 ± 1.36 μg/mL, P = 0.017), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal SC (6.73 ± 2.74 μg/mL, P = 0.049), amniotic fluid-derived neural SC (8.052 ± 1.31 μg/mL, P = 0.0496), and enteric neural SC (6.60 ± 1.46 μg/mL, P = 0.033). SCs improve gut barrier function in experimental NEC. Although all four types of SC reduce permeability equivalently, SC derived from amniotic fluid may be preferable due to availability at delivery and ease of culture, potentially enhancing clinical translation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 18%
Researcher 3 18%
Student > Postgraduate 2 12%
Student > Master 2 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 12%
Other 5 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 59%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 18%
Unspecified 3 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2017.
All research outputs
#9,361,126
of 12,196,802 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Surgical Research
#2,398
of 3,422 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#176,070
of 266,922 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Surgical Research
#74
of 154 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,196,802 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,422 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,922 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 154 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.