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Increased rates of protein evolution and asymmetric deceleration after the whole-genome duplication in yeasts

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, February 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

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9 tweeters

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20 Dimensions

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Increased rates of protein evolution and asymmetric deceleration after the whole-genome duplication in yeasts
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-0895-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Diana Ascencio, Soledad Ochoa, Luis Delaye, Alexander DeLuna

Abstract

Whole-genome duplication (WGD) events have shaped the genomes of eukaryotic organisms. Relaxed selection after duplication along with inherent functional constraints are thought to determine the fate of the paralogs and, ultimately, the evolution of gene function. Here, we investigated the rate of protein evolution (as measured by dN/dS ratios) before and after the WGD in the hemiascomycete yeasts, and the way in which changes in such rates relate to molecular and biological function. For most groups of orthologous genes (81%) we observed a change in the rates of evolution after genome duplication. Genes with atypically-low dN/dS ratio before the WGD were prone to increase their rates of evolution after duplication. Importantly, the paralogs were often different in their rates of evolution after the WGD (50% cases), however, this was more consistent with an asymmetric deceleration in the protein-evolution rates, rather than an asymmetric increase of the initial rates. Functional-category analysis showed that regulatory proteins such as protein kinases and transcription factors were enriched in genes that increase their rates of evolution after the WGD. While changes in the rate of protein-sequence evolution were associated to protein abundance, content of disordered regions, and contribution to fitness, these features were an attribute of specific functional classes. Our results indicate that strong purifying selection in ancestral pre-duplication sequences is a strong predictor of increased rates after the duplication in yeasts and that asymmetry in evolution rate is established during the deceleration phase. In addition, changes in the rates at which paralogous sequences evolve before and after WGD are different for specific protein functions; increased rates of protein evolution after duplication occur preferentially in specific protein functions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 39 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 20%
Student > Bachelor 7 18%
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 30%
Chemistry 2 5%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Unknown 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2021.
All research outputs
#5,260,549
of 21,339,393 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,121
of 2,898 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,001
of 283,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,339,393 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,898 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,936 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them