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Antibiotic prescribing in women during and after delivery in a non-teaching, tertiary care hospital in Ujjain, India: a prospective cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, January 2013
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Title
Antibiotic prescribing in women during and after delivery in a non-teaching, tertiary care hospital in Ujjain, India: a prospective cross-sectional study
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/2052-3211-6-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Megha Sharma, Linda Sanneving, Kalpana Mahadik, Michele Santacatterina, Suryaprakash Dhaneria, Cecilia Stålsby Lundborg

Abstract

Antibacterial drugs (hereafter referred to as antibiotics) are crucial to treat infections during delivery and postpartum period to reduce maternal mortality. Institutional deliveries have the potential to save lives of many women but extensive use of antibiotics, add to the development and spread of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to present antibiotic prescribing among inpatients during and after delivery in a non-teaching, tertiary care hospital in the city of Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted including women having had either a vaginal delivery or a cesarean section in the hospital. Trained nursing staff collected the data on daily bases, using a specific form attached to each patient file. Statistical analysis, including bivariate and multivariable logistic regression was conducted. Of the total 1077 women, 566 (53%) had a vaginal delivery and 511 (47%) had a cesarean section. Eighty-seven percent of the women that had a vaginal delivery and 98% of the women having a cesarean section were prescribed antibiotics. The mean number of days on antibiotics in hospital for the women with a vaginal delivery was 3.1 (±1.7) and for the women with cesarean section was 6.0 (±2.5). Twenty-eight percent of both the women with vaginal deliveries and the women with cesarean sections were prescribed antibiotics at discharge. The most commonly prescribed antibiotic group in the hospital for both the women that had a vaginal delivery and the women that had a cesarean section were third-generation cephalosporins (J01DD). The total number of defined daily doses (DDD) per100 bed days for women that had a vaginal delivery was 101, and 127 for women that had a cesarean section. The high percentage of women having had a vaginal delivery that received antibiotics and the deviation from recommendation for cesarean section in the hospital is a cause of concern. Improved maternal health and rational use of antibiotics are intertwined. Specific policy and guidelines on how to prescribe antibiotics during delivery at health care facilities are needed. Additionally, monitoring system of antibiotic prescribing and resistance needs to be developed and implemented.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ghana 1 4%
Unknown 25 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 19%
Student > Master 5 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Other 2 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 38%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Social Sciences 2 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 6 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 November 2013.
All research outputs
#3,293,348
of 4,655,155 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#63
of 68 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,396
of 104,477 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,655,155 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 68 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 104,477 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.