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Ethical and legal duty of anesthesiologists regarding Jehovah's Witness patient: care protocol

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology (English edition), November 2016
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Title
Ethical and legal duty of anesthesiologists regarding Jehovah's Witness patient: care protocol
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology (English edition), November 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.bjane.2015.03.012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Augusto Key Karazawa Takaschima, Thiago Mamôru Sakae, Alexandre Karazawa Takaschima, Renata dos Santos Teodoro Takaschima, Breno José Santiago Bezerra de Lima, Roberto Henrique Benedetti

Abstract

Jehovah's Witnesses patients refuse blood transfusions for religious reasons. Anesthesiologists must master specific legal knowledge to provide care to these patients. Understanding how the Law and the Federal Council of Medicine treat this issue is critical to know how to act in this context. The aim of this paper was to establish a treatment protocol for the Jehovah's Witness patient with emphasis on ethical and legal duty of the anesthesiologist. The article analyzes the Constitution, Criminal Code, resolutions of the Federal Council of Medicine, opinions, and jurisprudence to understand the limits of the conflict between the autonomy of will of Jehovah's Witnesses to refuse transfusion and the physician's duty to provide the transfusion. Based on this evidence, a care protocol is suggested. The Federal Council of Medicine resolution 1021/1980, the penal code Article 135, which classifies denial of care as a crime and the Supreme Court decision on the HC 268,459/SP process imposes on the physician the obligation of blood transfusion when life is threatened. The patient's or guardian's consent is not necessary, as the autonomy of will manifestation of the Jehovah's Witness patient refusing blood transfusion for himself and relatives, even in emergencies, is no not forbidden.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 3%
Unknown 36 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 24%
Lecturer 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Student > Master 3 8%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 27%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 9 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2017.
All research outputs
#11,142,689
of 12,526,623 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology (English edition)
#89
of 109 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,897
of 258,074 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology (English edition)
#8
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,526,623 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 109 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,074 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.