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Homocysteine: cardiovascular risk factor in children and adolescents?

Overview of attention for article published in Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira, November 2013
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Title
Homocysteine: cardiovascular risk factor in children and adolescents?
Published in
Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira, November 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.ramb.2013.05.004
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adriana Amorim De Farias Leal, Ástrid Camêlo Palmeira, Gabriella Menezes Almeida De Castro, Mônica Oliveira Da Silva Simões, Alessandra Teixeira Ramos, Carla Campos Muniz Medeiros

Abstract

The aim of this study was to identify publications in literature that investigated Homocysteine (He) as a risk factor for CVD among children and adolescents. An active search for information in LILACS, IBECS, Science Direct, Medline and Cochrane Library databases was conducted using the following combination of keywords "homocysteine", "cardiovascular diseases", "child" and "adolescent". Fifteen articles were analyzed showing direct relationship with increasing age (8 studies) and male gender (10 studies), and an inverse relationship with serum vitamins B6, B12 and folate levels. Thus, the results suggest that more research must be carried through in order to determine in a more coherent way the causes of the hiperhomocisteinemia in the pediatric population, guiding for an adequate diet, rich in nutrients necessary to favor the metabolism of the He.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Romania 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 39 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 7 17%
Student > Master 7 17%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Unspecified 3 7%
Other 10 24%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 12%
Unspecified 3 7%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 9 22%
Unknown 5 12%