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Children left unattended in parked vehicles: a focus on recent italian cases and a review of literature

Overview of attention for article published in Italian Journal of Pediatrics, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 1,059)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

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36 X users

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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99 Mendeley
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Title
Children left unattended in parked vehicles: a focus on recent italian cases and a review of literature
Published in
Italian Journal of Pediatrics, November 2013
DOI 10.1186/1824-7288-39-71
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pietro Ferrara, Flaminia Vena, Olga Caporale, Valentina Del Volgo, Pio Liberatore, Francesca Ianniello, Antonio Chiaretti, Riccardo Riccardi

Abstract

Every year a lot of children die from heat stroke and hyperthermia because they have been left unattended in closed automobiles. These fatalities have augmented slightly in the past decade, but they are a poor recognized type of vehicle injury and little research has been done to discover the circumstances surrounding the fatal event. Two factors make children more prone to hyperthermia than adults: children have a greater surface area body mass ratio than adults and their thermoregulation is less efficient than adults. A scientific explanation about how it can happen that a parent leaves his child unattended in the car could be related to the Working Memory (WM): stress increases interference from irrelevant information, impairing selective attention and WM and influencing behavior. In the last two years in Italy 16 cases of child hyperthermia due to abandonment in motor vehicle were identified. These findings suggest that educational programs and literature for parents regarding automobile safety should include information about the potential dangers of heat stress, in fact, as these events are mostly unintentional, legislative efforts may be vain.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 36 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 99 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 16%
Researcher 9 9%
Student > Master 7 7%
Lecturer 7 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 20 20%
Unknown 34 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 25%
Engineering 13 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Computer Science 3 3%
Psychology 3 3%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 38 38%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2023.
All research outputs
#1,459,295
of 25,364,936 outputs
Outputs from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#48
of 1,059 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,514
of 228,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#1
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,364,936 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,059 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,653 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.