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Multiple sclerosis in South America: month of birth in different latitudes does not seem to interfere with the prevalence or progression of the disease

Overview of attention for article published in Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
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Title
Multiple sclerosis in South America: month of birth in different latitudes does not seem to interfere with the prevalence or progression of the disease
Published in
Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria, September 2013
DOI 10.1590/0004-282x20130098
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yara Dadalti Fragoso, Tarso Adoni, Sandra Maria Garcia de Almeida, Soniza Vieira Alves-Leon, Walter Oleschko Arruda, Fiorella Barbagelata-Aguero, Joseph Bruno Bidin Brooks, Adriana Carra, Rinaldo Claudino, Elizabeth Regina Comini-Frota, Eber Castro Correa, Alfredo Damasceno, Benito Pereira Damasceno, Ethel Ciampi Diaz, David George Elliff, Ana Patricia Peres Fiore, Clelia Maria Ribeiro Franco, Maria Cristina Brandao Giacomo, Sidney Gomes, Marcus Vinicius Magno Goncalves, Anderson Kuntz Grzesiuk, Jose Luiz Inojosa, Damacio Ramon Kaimen-Maciel, Katia Lin, Josiane Lopes, Gisele Alexandre Lourenco, Alejandra Diana Martinez, Mario Oscar Melcon, Nivea de Macedo Oliveira Morales, Rogerio Rizo Morales, Marcos Moreira, Shirlene Vianna Moreira, Celso Luis da Silva Oliveira, Francisco Tomaz Menezes de Oliveira, Joao Batista Ribeiro, Sonia Beatriz Felix Ribeiro, Claudia Carcamo Rodriguez, Liliana Russo, Juliana Safanelli, Kirsty Deborah Shearer, Fabio Siquineli, Darwin Vizcarra-Escobar

Abstract

To assess whether the month of birth in different latitudes of South America might influence the presence or severity of multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 21%
Researcher 6 16%
Other 5 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 39%
Neuroscience 7 18%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 9 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2013.
All research outputs
#4,575,564
of 22,729,647 outputs
Outputs from Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria
#194
of 1,243 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,720
of 200,192 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria
#3
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,729,647 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,243 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 200,192 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.