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Posição socioeconômica no curso de vida e comportamentos de risco relacionados à saúde: ELSA-Brasil

Overview of attention for article published in Cadernos de Saúde Pública, January 2017
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Title
Posição socioeconômica no curso de vida e comportamentos de risco relacionados à saúde: ELSA-Brasil
Published in
Cadernos de Saúde Pública, January 2017
DOI 10.1590/0102-311x00017916
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jéssica Costa Faleiro, Luana Giatti, Sandhi Maria Barreto, Lidyane do Valle Camelo, Rosane Härter Griep, Joanna M. N. Guimarães, Maria de Jesus Mendes da Fonseca, Dóra Chor, Maria da Conceição Almeida Chagas

Abstract

Our objective was to investigate the association between lifetime socioeconomic status and intra-generational social mobility and low consumption of fruits and vegetables, leisure-time physical inactivity, and smoking among 13,216 men and women participating in the baseline of the ELSA-Brazil study (2008-2010). Socioeconomic status in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood was measured by maternal schooling, socio-occupational class of the first occupation, and socio-occupational class of the current occupation, respectively. Social disadvantages in adulthood were consistently associated with higher prevalence of the three behaviors analyzed in men and women. However, socioeconomic status in youth and childhood was less consistently associated with the behaviors. For example, while low maternal schooling reduced the odds of past smoking (women) and current smoking (men and women), it was associated with higher odds of leisure-time physical inactivity in women. Meanwhile, low socioeconomic status in youth increased the odds of past smoking (men and women) and current smoking (women). Analysis of social trajectories lent additional support to the relevance of disadvantages in adulthood for risk behaviors, since only individuals that rose to the high socio-occupational class did not show higher odds of these behaviors when compared to participants that had always belonged to the high socio-occupational class. Our findings indicate that socioeconomic disadvantages in adulthood appear to be more relevant for risk behaviors than disadvantages in childhood and adolescence.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 11 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 9 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 19%
Psychology 3 8%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 14 39%