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Resurgence of measles in Serbia 2010–2011 highlights the need for supplementary immunization activities

Overview of attention for article published in Epidemiology & Infection, October 2015
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Title
Resurgence of measles in Serbia 2010–2011 highlights the need for supplementary immunization activities
Published in
Epidemiology & Infection, October 2015
DOI 10.1017/s0950268815002277
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. NEDELJKOVIĆ, S. RAKIĆ ADROVIĆ, G. TASIĆ, V. KOVAČEVIĆ-JOVANOVIĆ, G. LONČAREVIĆ, J. M. HÜBSCHEN, C. P. MULLER

Abstract

Between December 2010 and August 2011 an outbreak of measles occurred in Serbia with 363 reported cases. Sera and/or nose/throat swabs were collected from 193 patients and tested for measles-specific IgM antibodies by ELISA and viral RNA by RT-PCR, respectively. Epidemiological data were obtained from the surveillance database of the Institute of Public Health of Serbia. Of the 363 cases involved in the outbreak, 113 were laboratory confirmed. More than one third of the patients were hospitalized (n = 130, 35·8%) and for 15 (4·1% of the reported outbreak cases) the infection was complicated by pneumonia. Mostly pre-school children aged ⩽4 years (37·8%) and adults aged ⩾30 years (27·3%) were affected. The majority of patients belonged to the Roma population with a preponderance of female cases (57·0%). Nearly 94% of the patients were either unvaccinated or of unknown vaccination status. The main outbreak virus was the D4-Hamburg strain. The outbreak in Serbia occurred after several years of very low measles incidence despite a high routine immunization coverage in the general population, suggesting that special efforts to identify and vaccinate susceptible population groups are required even in countries with apparently good disease control.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 17%
Student > Bachelor 6 14%
Student > Master 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 12 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 19%
Unspecified 3 7%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 18 43%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2023.
All research outputs
#17,286,645
of 25,377,790 outputs
Outputs from Epidemiology & Infection
#3,532
of 4,680 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#174,099
of 290,716 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epidemiology & Infection
#28
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,377,790 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,680 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,716 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.