↓ Skip to main content

How mangrove forests adjust to rising sea level

Overview of attention for article published in New Phytologist, November 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
32 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
229 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
471 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
How mangrove forests adjust to rising sea level
Published in
New Phytologist, November 2013
DOI 10.1111/nph.12605
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ken W. Krauss, Karen L. McKee, Catherine E. Lovelock, Donald R. Cahoon, Neil Saintilan, Ruth Reef, Luzhen Chen

Abstract

Mangroves are among the most well described and widely studied wetland communities in the world. The greatest threats to mangrove persistence are deforestation and other anthropogenic disturbances that can compromise habitat stability and resilience to sea-level rise. To persist, mangrove ecosystems must adjust to rising sea level by building vertically or become submerged. Mangroves may directly or indirectly influence soil accretion processes through the production and accumulation of organic matter, as well as the trapping and retention of mineral sediment. In this review, we provide a general overview of research on mangrove elevation dynamics, emphasizing the role of the vegetation in maintaining soil surface elevations (i.e. position of the soil surface in the vertical plane). We summarize the primary ways in which mangroves may influence sediment accretion and vertical land development, for example, through root contributions to soil volume and upward expansion of the soil surface. We also examine how hydrological, geomorphological and climatic processes may interact with plant processes to influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with rising sea level. We draw on a variety of studies to describe the important, and often under-appreciated, role that plants play in shaping the trajectory of an ecosystem undergoing change.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 471 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 <1%
Philippines 2 <1%
South Africa 2 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 455 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 105 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 83 18%
Researcher 73 15%
Student > Bachelor 64 14%
Professor 26 6%
Other 82 17%
Unknown 38 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 179 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 127 27%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 58 12%
Engineering 17 4%
Social Sciences 5 1%
Other 25 5%
Unknown 60 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 84. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 December 2019.
All research outputs
#259,343
of 15,821,176 outputs
Outputs from New Phytologist
#99
of 6,476 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,753
of 263,489 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New Phytologist
#1
of 124 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,821,176 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,476 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,489 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 124 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.