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Widespread movement of meltwater onto and across Antarctic ice shelves

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
68 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
152 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
119 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Widespread movement of meltwater onto and across Antarctic ice shelves
Published in
Nature, April 2017
DOI 10.1038/nature22049
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonathan Kingslake, Jeremy C. Ely, Indrani Das, Robin E. Bell

Abstract

Surface meltwater drains across ice sheets, forming melt ponds that can trigger ice-shelf collapse, acceleration of grounded ice flow and increased sea-level rise. Numerical models of the Antarctic Ice Sheet that incorporate meltwater's impact on ice shelves, but ignore the movement of water across the ice surface, predict a metre of global sea-level rise this century in response to atmospheric warming. To understand the impact of water moving across the ice surface a broad quantification of surface meltwater and its drainage is needed. Yet, despite extensive research in Greenland and observations of individual drainage systems in Antarctica, we have little understanding of Antarctic-wide surface hydrology or how it will evolve. Here we show widespread drainage of meltwater across the surface of the ice sheet through surface streams and ponds (hereafter 'surface drainage') as far south as 85° S and as high as 1,300 metres above sea level. Our findings are based on satellite imagery from 1973 onwards and aerial photography from 1947 onwards. Surface drainage has persisted for decades, transporting water up to 120 kilometres from grounded ice onto and across ice shelves, feeding vast melt ponds up to 80 kilometres long. Large-scale surface drainage could deliver water to areas of ice shelves vulnerable to collapse, as melt rates increase this century. While Antarctic surface melt ponds are relatively well documented on some ice shelves, we have discovered that ponds often form part of widespread, large-scale surface drainage systems. In a warming climate, enhanced surface drainage could accelerate future ice-mass loss from Antarctic, potentially via positive feedbacks between the extent of exposed rock, melting and thinning of the ice sheet.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 152 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 3%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 114 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 28%
Researcher 28 24%
Unspecified 15 13%
Student > Master 13 11%
Professor 11 9%
Other 19 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 79 66%
Unspecified 17 14%
Environmental Science 15 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 3%
Physics and Astronomy 2 2%
Other 2 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 726. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 February 2019.
All research outputs
#6,670
of 12,662,735 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#1,051
of 65,573 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#395
of 259,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#43
of 721 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,662,735 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 65,573 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 73.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,838 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 721 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.